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What is your copywriting sales pitch?

Discussion in 'Copywriting' started by mauik, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. #1
    As I'm sure most of you have encountered at some time, clients often scoff at the idea of hiring a professional copywriter for myriad reasons.

    I'm just curious to find out how different people have "pitched" their services to clients in the past, and what has been most successful?
    SEMrush
     
    mauik, Jan 13, 2009 IP
    SEMrush
  2. Loren Woirhaye

    Loren Woirhaye Peon

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    #2
    Don't waste your time with prospects who scoff at the
    value of professional writing. Just move on.

    If you are finding yourself "pitching" and getting scoffed
    at you really need to learn how to get prospects moving
    towards you and saying YES before the actual conversation.

    This is accomplished through marketing.
     
    Loren Woirhaye, Jan 13, 2009 IP
  3. Y.L. Prinzel

    Y.L. Prinzel Peon

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    #3

    I have to agree with Loren. It's one thing to introduce someone to the idea of what a writer can do for them but, in most cases, if someone scoffs at the idea of hiring a writer they are probably a person who over values their own abilities and will consistently look at your work as though they could have done the same.

    Like people who say their child could paint like Jackson Pollack.

    There are plenty of people out there who gladly understand the need, and pay dearly for it. You may need to find out how to find these people though. Local clubs like Toastmasters and small business gatherings are great places to find them.
     
    Y.L. Prinzel, Jan 13, 2009 IP
  4. mauik

    mauik Peon

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    #4
    I definitely agree with both of you from a freelance standpoint, but I'm actually trying to talk a client into outsourcing the copy for a website to a third party in this situation, not necessarily for my own gain. The content they provide is atrocious, and I hesitate to provide a great website design that will be filled with drivel.
     
    mauik, Jan 13, 2009 IP
  5. Y.L. Prinzel

    Y.L. Prinzel Peon

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    #5
    I would suggest two things. Without knowing what the site is trying to accomplish, it's hard to know exactly what will work:

    1. You don't attract repeat visitors with a pretty design. People do not come back to a website week after week to see the graphics. They come back to read new content because it's funny, informative, inspirational, educational, whatever.

    2. While a nicely designed site does give people the confidence to trust the site's product/ service/ adsense ads, if the content is written poorly you strip that confidence away. It's just like a business meeting. If you have a meeting with someone who dresses well but talks like an idiot, are you going to give them your money? And an intelligent person who dresses like a slob may have a better chance....but you will not feel entirely confident in that person's judgment.
     
    Y.L. Prinzel, Jan 13, 2009 IP
  6. cd928

    cd928 Peon

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    #6
    If I were to oversimplify it, be sure to present a problem to them first and tell them that you'll help them fix it. You also tell them how you will go about fixing that project and the kind of value that the fixing will provide. But before you jump in and say, 'your site sucks, let me fix it,' you should be able to find out what exactly is the problem and present a better way of doing it.

    If they don't buy your pitch, move on to your other prospects. Or cry first because you didn't get the job. But don't stop looking for prospects.
     
    cd928, Jan 14, 2009 IP
  7. Capistrano

    Capistrano Peon

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    #7
    Here's what I have done:
    1. Publish only well written advertisements.
    2. Provide samples of my work to prospective clients.
    3. Provide client references.
     
    Capistrano, Jan 14, 2009 IP
  8. articleterritory

    articleterritory Peon

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    #8
    Grab a blanket, hop in bed, and ball your eyes out!;)

    But like CD said above, "Keep Looking".

    The worst a writer can do is to fall into a dark-and gloomy pit of self depreciation....

    Always remember, your words are viciously effective tools capable of changing minds of hard headed posers who couldn't write a single sentence, let alone any type of-actually productive website copy!

    If your client doesn't already realize the investment value of purchasing professional web copy, its your job to educate them with enough information to cause them to realize they would be literally throwing money away-if they decided not to invest in your services....

    I like to use the "Mental Artist" technique.... (That's not the real name)

    When I write my pitch, I'll paint a picture with words.... Once you can capture your clients visual attention, and auditory attention, at the same time; then you'll begin to see a difference in conversions.

    Good Luck!
     
    articleterritory, Jan 15, 2009 IP
  9. DavidF9

    DavidF9 Active Member

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    #9
    Good clients appreciate the value of writing services. Bad clients scoff and ultimately become awkward and undervalue your services, no matter how much work you do.

    The clients that already understand your input when they propose a project are the guys you want to keep on-side.

    As for the rest...
     
    DavidF9, Jan 15, 2009 IP
  10. webgal

    webgal Peon

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    #10
    I don't work for those I have to hard sell. I'd rather they fall on their faces first and then land on my doorstep a seasoned pro. I also don't get calls from people who don't want a pro.

    But I did meet with a client not too long ago that kept saying "oh, this shouldn't take you more than an hour" when he was referring to things that would take 10 hours. Dropped them like a hot potato. Let them struggle and get other prices and get a shot of reality.
     
    webgal, Jan 16, 2009 IP
  11. Power_Writer

    Power_Writer Peon

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    #11
    I don't charge exorbitant rates (or even industry rates for that matter), but I do charge about 4-6 times more than most people shilling here on Digital Point.

    When potential customers ask me why, I explain that I deliver high-quality work on deadline every time. It's as simple as that. And if you've ever tried to buy work off of some of the service providers (aka "writers") on sites like this one, GetAFreelancer or even ELance, you know that most are:

    -Low-quality
    -Notoriously unreliable

    For example, I've purchased content on here 4 times (on behalf of other clients and with their knowledge) and not a single project was delivered on time and only once did I actually use the full, submitted work (after editing it for an hour).

    And like webgal, I tend to avoid the clients that try to lowball my prices. A little negotiation is fine, but there's a limit. Besides, I can get work elsewhere and I'd rather spend my extra time drumming up worthwhile sales than sweating at my desk for pennies.
     
    Power_Writer, Jan 16, 2009 IP
  12. sarah_harvey

    sarah_harvey Active Member

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    #12
    Sometimes, as the designer you have the right to suggest alternatives, but in the end, the customer is king! You need to understand, that some people are quite possessive and fussy when it comes to their content. Believe me, I have been in that situation before a few times. The best route is to politely suggest someone that may be of benefit to them, and I can't stress that point enough in this sense...because if you come across as pushy or overeager to get them someone else, they may question your motives. Some business professionals will think you are merely in this for yourself and will refuse, while others will not appreciate the attitude and simply not refer to you for future business.

    I will point something out though...

    It seems quite strange that you are trying to force this client to get someone to write the content for them at this stage. Personally, if you accept your projects, you should evaluate their site first before accepting to work with them. If it was me, I would be really insulted if someone accepted my project and then later, decline on the basis of bad content - especially if I wrote it or someone like a friend etc.

    However, since you accepted the project and especially if you signed an agreement, you would be obligated to go through with it.

    People should remember that as a freelancer writer/designer you have full control over what projects you take on. But more importantly, is to keep the client's ideas at hand when tackling the task and making sure their needs are met adequately. A happy client is worth it in the end.

    Of course, you cannot make everyone happy, and I am not talking about being unreasonable, but it does add a big difference if you go the extra mile.

    :D
     
    sarah_harvey, Jan 17, 2009 IP
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  13. YMC

    YMC Well-Known Member

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    #13
    Putting a bow on a pile of crap still leaves you with a stinky mess.

    I agree with Y.L. Prinzel that it would be a good idea to sit down with your client and try to explain the merits of improving the content. They are investing in their business by hiring you to improve the look of their website. They are simply throwing away their money if the content is as poor as you imply.

    Perhaps, you could suggest that they invest in having a single page rewritten and use that as a starting point?
     
    YMC, Jan 17, 2009 IP
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  14. DocB

    DocB Member

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    #14
    I agree that maybe getting them to agree to have one page rewitten as a starting point might be the way to go. In my experience clients are happy with what they have until they can see something better. Of course it will depend if they are resistant to spending money or if they just don't understand the value of well written content, but the one page to begin with is the middle ground in that respect.

    Explaining what's in it for them is usually the best approach, and as already mentioned here, outlining how good content will encourage people to come back is probably the best motivator. Showing them content of competitors can also work as it can help to make them understand the kind of marketplace they are competing and the standard others are offering.
     
    DocB, Jan 20, 2009 IP
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  15. what

    what Active Member

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    #15
    Clients who are really serious in taking their business onto another level know the value of a good copywriter. Don't sell yourself short - if you get scoffed, then move on. There are lots of fish in the sea.
     
    what, Jan 20, 2009 IP
  16. Ray Edwards

    Ray Edwards Member

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    #16
    Your best clients will definitely be business owners who are already
    aware of the importance of great copywriting. If you have to educate
    a customer about this then your work will be harder.

    Most prospects want to see samples, testimonials, references and
    have some idea that you are a real human being with a real address.

    Having been writing for clients now online for about 6 years, I find
    that when clients find you, you are always in a better position then
    when you are trying to find them.

    So write interesting articles, maintain a decent blog and give away
    all your secrets. They would want you to do the WRITING for them
    even though they know your secrets.

    -Ray Edwards.
     
    Ray Edwards, Jan 22, 2009 IP