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We need to get rid of vaccines

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by VACC, Mar 24, 2017.

?

Should we?

  1. Yes

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  2. No

    8 vote(s)
    88.9%
  1. #1
    They cause autism, we need to get rid of them.
    SEMrush
     
    VACC, Mar 24, 2017 IP
    SEMrush
  2. Holafromspain

    Holafromspain Greenhorn

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    #2
    Really? Why don't I go get you a tin foil hat. There's NO scientific evidence that vaccines cause autism, besides, even if vaccines did cause autism, weigh the effects of potential autism to some of the diseases vaccines prevent. People in third world countries would love to get the vaccines you hate and are dying because they can't.
     
    Holafromspain, Mar 24, 2017 IP
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  3. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #3
    Yes, let's let polio, smallpox, etc., etc., gain a foothold again with the human race. No sense keeping us healthy just in case there are unproven side effects of these life-saving vaccines. :rolleyes:

    By the way, @Holafromspain I have great tinfoil hats for the OP; they are dual use: you can also use them to make a great baked potato!
     
    jrbiz, Mar 25, 2017 IP
  4. matt_62

    matt_62 Notable Member

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    #4
    op is proof. he is autistic....
    Vaccines are important in ways most people do not understand. Some vaccines, will not necessarily save your life... but will reduce your ability to pass those diseases to others who are vulnerable and cannot be vaccinated. For example, if you have not had recent vaccines, you should not visit people with babies under 8 weeks old, as you could potentially pass on stuff, that they have no immunity to, and cannot be vaccinated against as they are too young.

    On another note: I heard an interesting argument that claims that antibiotics should be administered by a doctor, and or with medical professionals present, and along with the claim, reduce the total number and or prescriptions of antibiotics to the general public.

    The reasoning is that over prescription and people not finishing their course of antibiotics can, and has created antibiotic resistant viruses. They are concerned about that one day, we could lose antibiotics as an effective medicine.

    You have to remember that the medical community is here for our benefit. They spend their lives to help humans live longer, and healthier lives.
    End of the day, follow the advice from your medical practitioner. Not from lunatics that you meet online.
     
    matt_62, Mar 25, 2017 IP
  5. Hybirid

    Hybirid Greenhorn

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    #5
    What kind of nonsense are you saying?!
    To date, vaccination is the most powerful and effective preventive method of fighting infections. With the help of vaccines, suffering, disability and death can be prevented.
    Everyone knows that it is better to prevent the disease than to treat an already ill person.
     
    Hybirid, Mar 27, 2017 IP
  6. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #6
    This has already happened, according to a news story I saw on TV this weekend. There are already a few "super bugs" that have immunity to all but one or two of our most powerful antibiotics and they were saying that there is now one of these "super bugs" for which we have no antibiotic.
     
    jrbiz, Mar 27, 2017 IP
  7. superrichguy

    superrichguy Well-Known Member

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    #7
    I am against most vaccines. When my daughter was born they wanted to give her a vaccine for something that is sexually transmitted. Why does she need that? She doesnt! Look into autism and look into the vaccines, when I was a kid there were 12 or so, now there are 100 you need to get when you are born.
     
    superrichguy, Mar 27, 2017 IP
  8. melprise

    melprise Active Member

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    #8
    Since the rise in frequency, potency and heavy metal toxicity of modern vaccines, instances of "autism" (or an autism-like condition) have grown from one in several thousand, to under one in 100. The only populations exempt from this increase were homeschoolers, Amish villages and some new immigrant families, who usually did not submit to the vaccine schedule. There is NO logical explanation for why those populations should have vastly smaller autism rates, other than not being vaccinated---it's the only different variable.
     
    melprise, Mar 27, 2017 IP
  9. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #9
    The do not cause autism!! That is just a made up pseudoscience conspiracy.
    All the good scientific evidence is really really clear on that
    All of the experts that work in immunology and autism agree on that.
    Listen to the experts and not some random nut job on the web.
    Take off your tin foil hat.
     
    Agent000, Mar 27, 2017 IP
  10. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #10
    The facts do not support your claim. The Amish get autism. There is no evidence or research done on homeschoolars, so you are making that up.
    As to the increased frequency, that is simply due to the changing diagnostic criteria and sensitivity; and as increased services and $ available for those with a diagnosis means more are getting diagnosed to access the $ and services.
    I will stick to what the expert epidemiologists say on this rather than what non-experts make up
     
    Agent000, Mar 27, 2017 IP
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  11. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #11
    Bingo, much like many other diseases, syndromes, etc., that seem to be on the rise, it is simply the fact that medical issues and conditions are being diagnosed and reported much more regularly. When I was a kid, it was a rare event to have contact with the medical establishment of any sort. Most medical problems were never diagnosed and, if they were, only our family doctor knew about them. My kids go to the doctor regularly and their pediatricians report all kinds of things to various agencies.
     
    jrbiz, Mar 28, 2017 IP
  12. sarahk

    sarahk iTamer Staff

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    #12
    You came to an internet marketing site to share this indepth opinion?

    My daughter's vaccines were timed for what suited the medical establishment's welfare checks - a reason to oblige parents to come in with their kids. I was a bit slow and it wasn't until after the second round that I realised how ill she was getting from them - and a bit longer to realise it wasn't the vaccine but an underlying health problem that was being triggered. Fought to get a diagnosis, and luckily she needed was growing time and not treatment. All we had to do was wait until she was older and stronger and vaccinate then.

    The crazy thing about that is that makes me an "anti-vaxxer" even though both kids are fully immunised.
     
    sarahk, Mar 28, 2017 IP
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  13. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #13
    Despite my posts above, I have refused some vaccines. The flu vaccine is one that I have never taken, though my wife and kids do and I am all for them doing so. I don't take the flu vaccine or the pneumonia vaccine mostly because I do not like needles nor the thought of putting foreign things into my bloodstream and the consequences are not that great: if I come down with the flu or even pneumonia, I will recover. And, of course, the effectiveness of a specific flu vaccine is always in question vis-à-vis the flu strain going around that year. However, I am really happy that I had the polio vaccine when I was a child because the consequences of acquiring polio are severe (paralysis or worse.) So, I guess that I vacillate on vaccines (how is that for alliteration, eh?)
     
    jrbiz, Mar 28, 2017 IP
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  14. melprise

    melprise Active Member

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    #14
    Below are whole pages of facts and science that support my claim, including homeschooler and Amish research. Yes, there are Amish and homeschooled children who exhibit autism, but the point is it is RARE compared to the 1 in 68 getting autism who follow the modern vaccine regimen. That is, autism is historically rare, and remains rare outside of the heavily vaccinated population of the last 25-30 years, where rates have skyrocketed 1000%.

    The populations rarely displaying the disorder have been evaluated with the same or similar "diagnostic criteria and sensitivity" as the general population. The references also document censorship of research that points to a vaccine-autsm link, or fraud committed by 'experts' to support use of vaccines. So, your rebuttal has no merit, and belittlement tactics don't work anymore:

    https://healthcareinamerica.us/cens...cinated-sees-daylight-4be6f3a03c1c#.uk3lzbwrd
    http://www.naturalnews.com/027178_autism_vaccines.html
    http://www.ageofautism.com/science/
    http://www.naturalnews.com/055540_allergies_vaccines_hypersensitivity.html
     
    melprise, Mar 28, 2017 IP
  15. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #15
    FFS!! Those sites are always listed as the most not credible health sites on the web!!!! They are nothing but silly conspiracy nutjob sites. Seriously? !!!! They just make stuff up for click bait and you fell for it!
    Stick to what the actual experts in this topic says.
    Here is some real evidence on immunization in the Amish:
    http :// pediatrics.aappublications.org/ content/early/2011/06/23/peds.2009-2599 (DP won't let me post link properly)
    They get immunized at a rate just below the national average (yet you claim they do not get immunized)

    according to this real research:
    https://imfar.confex.com/imfar/2010/webprogram/Paper7336.html
    amish get autism at a rate of 1 in 271 (yet you claim that they do not get it!)

    Please stick to actual science and real data and what the real experts are saying rather than be gullible and fall for what the conspiracy nutjob websites spout.
     
    Agent000, Mar 28, 2017 IP
  16. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #16
    The links that you provide are of private entities selling something or otherwise trying to profit from their content. Along these lines, I can come up with links to a number of websites claiming that the earth is flat but that does not make it so and they would not likely be taken seriously. It would be a more compelling and credible argument if you had links to scientific organizations like the NIH, CDC, etc. Or, perhaps renowned medical institutions like the Mayo Clinic or Harvard Medical websites.
     
    jrbiz, Mar 28, 2017 IP
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  17. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #17
    BTW, here is the real cause of the autism "epidemic". We need to get rid of organic food. Why aren't the conspiracy nutjob websites calling for the banning of organic food?
     

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    Agent000, Mar 28, 2017 IP
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  18. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

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    #18
    Great graphic! Shows you the value of statistics and so-called correlations. I wonder if organic food is responsible for alien abductions as they are on the increase, I have heard?

    The low-carb guy, Atkins, did have some very interesting correlations when he was promoting his low-carb diet: he noted that in the 1990's and 2000's there was a wholesale move in the American food and restaurant industry to reduce fats, especially saturated fats and there was a notable uptick in gym memberships over previous decades. So, by the gross numbers, the population was eating healthier (according to leading nutritionists of the time) and exercising more at least to some extent. What was the result of those two macro statistics? The population became fatter than ever.
     
    jrbiz, Mar 28, 2017 IP
  19. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #19
    Try this correlation ...
    This is where the conspiracy nut jobs get it so wrong: correlation ≠ causation
     

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    Agent000, Mar 28, 2017 IP
  20. sarahk

    sarahk iTamer Staff

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    #20
    I'd want to find a study that looked at vaccinations, food, atmospheric pollutants, plastics, socio economics, education and mental health. I bet you that you won't find a credible, repeatable study.

    Studies into the microbiome have shown that autistic kids have few varieties of bugs in their gut than "normal people" - that opens up a whole can of worms regarding the link between gut health and brain health and we're only just scratching the surface there, there is a heap of work to be done before we can even confirm the findings let alone understand the mechanics of it, and then what happens when you try to manipulate the microbiome.

    FWIW when I talk about vaccines and kids I'm talking about the "required" vaccines in NZ and they exclude flu, pneumonia, hep a, hep c, chicken pox. The "required" list includes MMR, polio, meningitis and the more controversial gardasil.

    I have a friend who is an A&E chief in a city hospital who advocates for "less medicine" but gets really stroppy about parents who buy into the whole autism bullshit. I think I'd trust his judgement over David Wolfe & co.
     
    sarahk, Mar 28, 2017 IP