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Three tags in HTML.

Discussion in 'HTML & Website Design' started by cherry135, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. #1
    For SEO, I think the title tag, description tag and keyword tag are important in HTML. And these tags had better to be related to the site content.
    SEMrush
     
    cherry135, Oct 14, 2013 IP
    SEMrush
  2. vinith98

    vinith98 Well-Known Member

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    #2
    I don't understand the purpose of this thread.

    Most of us know about these tags. And its common knowledge that majority of search engines do not give importance to the keyword tag.
     
    vinith98, Oct 14, 2013 IP
    ryan_uk likes this.
  3. ApocalypseXL

    ApocalypseXL Notable Member

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    #3
    He wants to rack up the post count and make himself look smart by posting useless information
     
    ApocalypseXL, Oct 15, 2013 IP
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  4. Auxi

    Auxi Well-Known Member

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    #4
    Do not be evil to new users :p
     
    Auxi, Oct 15, 2013 IP
  5. deathshadow

    deathshadow Acclaimed Member

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    #5
    Hard not to when it's TSDR SEO-tard BS... two of which aren't even TAGS, they're metaData. The TAG is META. (the word is moot, not mute! Units go rogue, not rouge!)

    But let's review: ... and anyone who sees this and goes TLDR, GTFO right now you HWIT and go do something less detail oriented like macramé!

    TITLE -- exists to be shown as the text for a link to the page on a site, to be shown on the titlebar of a window, or the title of a tab -- letting people know not only what site the link is to or the tab/window is, but also what page on that site. This is why my titles usually read "$pageName - $siteTitle" -- for example "SEO-tards, STFU -- Cut Code Down" where "SEO-tards STFU" is the title of the article, and "Cut Code Down" is the website the article is on. It does NOT exist for SEO-tards to pack full of keywords, so STOP abusing it for that before the engine slaps you down. Likewise it's best to keep it below 80 characters since anything longer than that is unlikely to be used anyways.

    META[description] exists JUST as a short sentence or two (preferably 128 characters or less) to describe the page. It is typically used in your SERP Listing to be shown below the TITLE and url. that's ALL it is for. You might end up with some 'keywords' in it, you might not. The most important part of building it is that it should be written to make people want to visit the site from what it looks like on the SERP.

    P.S. SERP == search engine results page, it does NOT mean your ranking, that would be your SERP position... SERP listing is what your page looks like on the SERP. GET THE SMEGGING TERMINOLOGY RIGHT!!!

    ... and that just leaves META[keywords] -- which everyone and their brother says is ignored, when if you bother following the damned rules it isn't. KeyWORDS is simple, and it's called keyWORDS for a reason! NOT keyphrases, NOT keysentences, keyWORDS!!!!!!!!!!!! A comma delimited list of seven or eight WORDS that exist inside <BODY> totaling no more than 96 characters you want to receive a slight ranking boost on. The ONLY reason it would be more than one word between comma's would be proper names like "New Jersey" or "Randall Graves". You do NOT have to 'word jumble' every possible combination, that's how you get ignored. You do not use vertical breaks, semicolons, or any other character as delimiters, that's how you get ignored. You do NOT stuff it full of 4k of terms, that's how you get ignored. You do NOT put words in it that don't even exist on the document, that's... well, do I need to say it?!?

    ... a great example I use a good deal is this steaming pile of manure:
    <meta
         name="keywords"
         content="babysitting keene new hampshire, babysitting winchester new hampshire, babysitting chesterfield new hampshire, babysitting walpole new hampshire"
     />
    Code (markup):
    Which is redundant, pointless, and guaranteed to be ignored! This on the other hand:
    <meta
         name="keywords"
         content="babysitting, new hampshire, keene, winchester, chesterfield, walpole"
     />
    Code (markup):
    would hit ALL the same points, and most likely still work despite even the search engine's claims of it not working... assuming those words exist inside <BODY> -- if they don't, you might as well not bother declaring it.

    But of course NOBODY seems to bother doing a blasted thing properly, so abuse of the TITLE and META tags is pretty much par for the course -- what with pretty much everyone having their heads wedged so far up 1997's ass, they actually think HTML 5 is worth using and was a good idea.
     
    deathshadow, Oct 16, 2013 IP
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