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Should I Learn PHP or Ruby on Rails?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Sleepy_Sentry, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. #1
    I'm interested in learning some programming/scripting. I already know HTML/CSS and have worked with VB a little bit in the past.
    SEMrush
    Which language is easier to learn? Is one better than the other?
     
    Sleepy_Sentry, Apr 27, 2007 IP
    SEMrush
  2. xubz

    xubz Peon

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    #2
    Both have their own Advantages and Disadvantages,
    But PHP is widely used and is easy to code, whereas Ruby is a High-Level Language.. (Well, I Feel its 'Assembly' for the Web :p)

    Learn PHP :)
     
    xubz, Apr 28, 2007 IP
  3. dzysyak

    dzysyak Peon

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    #3
    I have tried Ruby, but after PHP I do not felt comfortable with ruby.
     
    dzysyak, Apr 29, 2007 IP
  4. Jeoru

    Jeoru Well-Known Member

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    #4
    Learn both if possible. But if you have to choose, PHP. :)
     
    Jeoru, Apr 29, 2007 IP
  5. MattD

    MattD Peon

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    #5
    Personally I didn't like ruby as a programming language years ago, and I still dont like it now that Ruby on Rails has appeared either.

    Rails is fine, but its kinda like a "Website Wizard!" in that its great and super easy to make fairly conventional things (like blogs etc) but as soon as you want to start trying out something fun or quirky you have to actually dig into the generated code and mess with it, which is not fun!

    I'd start with PHP as its a more generic syntax (i.e. you can reuse your skills elsewhere more easily probably), and there are Ruby on Rails style toolsets out there if you really really want the Website Wizard feel.
     
    MattD, Apr 29, 2007 IP
  6. Faltzer

    Faltzer Peon

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    #6
    Ruby comes stacked with all of the useful functions that a programmer needs - right out of the box, in an intelligent and well documented manner. Want to check if one string is contained in another? string1.include? string2. Not ( !(strpos($string1,$string2) === false)) (or however that goes) or anything else obfuscated. It's just /right there/.
     
    Faltzer, Apr 29, 2007 IP
  7. ccoonen

    ccoonen Well-Known Member

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    #7
    PHP fo sho, lots more support than RUBY (ruby is such an old language)
     
    ccoonen, Apr 29, 2007 IP
  8. fesite

    fesite Banned

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    #8
    I like PHP more.
     
    fesite, Apr 30, 2007 IP
  9. baker101

    baker101 Peon

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    #9
    "start trying out something fun or quirky you have to actually dig into the generated code and mess with it, which is not fun!"

    such as?





     
    baker101, Apr 30, 2007 IP
  10. baker101

    baker101 Peon

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    #10
    yea dont learn rails...

    most of all the cool features youd like to implement are most likely already written. it also cuts down on development time by so much you might not know what to do in your free time.
     
    baker101, Apr 30, 2007 IP
  11. canvalley

    canvalley Peon

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    #11
    My preference would be PHP if you are just looking for something to assist in developing your own sites. Ruby wouldn't be a bad idea if you are looking at getting into programming as a job.
     
    canvalley, Apr 30, 2007 IP
  12. MattD

    MattD Peon

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    #12


    Like if you have to delve into the guts of the mvc code to get it to do what you want, not what the framework designers wanted. Fair enough the need to do that is fairly rare, but if you want to "think outside the box" you may find it problematic.
     
    MattD, May 2, 2007 IP
  13. baker101

    baker101 Peon

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    #13
    the rails framework was created to handle all the common repetitive tasks and site organization. any part of the rails application can simply be custimized just by overiding methods.


     
    baker101, May 3, 2007 IP
  14. Faltzer

    Faltzer Peon

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    #14
    Ruby was made to keep the task simple, and not to give too much work. And if you've heard of this term before, you can <customize> your code if you don't like the generated code.
     
    Faltzer, May 3, 2007 IP
  15. krakjoe

    krakjoe Well-Known Member

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    #15
    I'm with Matt on this one, the amount of support you can get when you're learning php because of the amount of people that know php in the first place is uncomparable to any other web, or possibly otherwise, programming language.

    Once you have learnt, once you have a programming mind, then sure, ruby and rails are great tools, but not so much for the learners, php can be worlds simpler than rails can be; at it's simplest, I tend to think Oo can be a little daunting. For a non-programming mind, procedural code looks more like a "language" on a page, once you get to know what a language really is in a programming sense Oo starts to read clearly, but I think to start you should start simple and ruby just isn't that.
     
    krakjoe, May 4, 2007 IP
  16. baker101

    baker101 Peon

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    #16
    krakjoe, i think your spot on. people who have no programming experience, learning RoR would definitly be challenging. however, if they can get past the learning curve, i think RoR would definitly be a time saver when creating new applications. what i like best about RoR is the simplicity to add new functionality to the models and to the site.



     
    baker101, May 4, 2007 IP
  17. nytrokiss

    nytrokiss Peon

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    #17
    if you are going web 2.0 go ROR (ruby on rails)
     
    nytrokiss, May 4, 2007 IP
  18. WebHive

    WebHive Peon

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    #18
    My advice to start with php. ROR is still pretty slow for product development, hostings with ROR are not so cheap and widespread.

    There is a cakephp framework for php that has almost the same advantages as ROR.
     
    WebHive, May 12, 2007 IP
  19. koloaTree

    koloaTree Peon

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    #19
    ROR main advantage is product development. hosting with ror is only 5 bucks a month for the cheapest service. most decent hosting companies host rail applications.

     
    koloaTree, May 13, 2007 IP
  20. gandaliter

    gandaliter Peon

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    #20
    I would have to say PHP, I imagine that there is far more support both in terms of documentation and in forums such as this one.
     
    gandaliter, May 13, 2007 IP