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Just diagonsed with diabetes need info

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by itchyjr10, May 12, 2008.

  1. sarahk

    sarahk iTamer Staff

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    #21
    You will have a local diabetes support group - go there and listen, listen hard.

    I'm guessing that you've either had a virus that has triggered it or you are grossly overweight. If it's the weight, then do something about it. By addressing the issues you can get your diabetes to a manageable level and it will be a factor in your life - but not a controlling factor.

    My mother didn't control her diabetes and spent 20 years in denial - taking her meds but refusing to make the lifestyle changes - she's now on dialysis 3x a week because her kidneys have shut down. That's pretty bad but what's really scary is the young people on dialysis. I don't know why, but their kidneys seem to get affected much more quickly.

    Don't mess with this - do what the doctors and diabetes professionals tell you!!!
    SEMrush
     
    sarahk, May 14, 2008 IP
    SEMrush
  2. whadyapuck

    whadyapuck Peon

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    #22
    Check out a juice called xango. One of their claims is that in many cases it has helped with diabetes. I wish you good luck.
     
    whadyapuck, May 14, 2008 IP
  3. sarahk

    sarahk iTamer Staff

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    #23
    No clinical trials and sold through MLM. Run a mile!
     
    sarahk, May 14, 2008 IP
  4. LeoSeo

    LeoSeo Well-Known Member

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    #24
    Don't be scared man, you just need to pay attention more on what you eat and take certain medications, tons of people live with it, you'll be fine.
     
    LeoSeo, May 14, 2008 IP
  5. desilator

    desilator Peon

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    #25
    It may be scary at first but youll get used to it soon. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes roughly 1 year ago and was nervous about it. I figured that I was no longer going to be able to eat a lot of the stuff I was eating but with the advances with insulin im still able to eat what I used to eat. Im basically eating what any person without diabetes is eating thanks to my insulin. Count the carbs from what it is im about to eat and take enough insulin to help the body digest those sugars. Best of luck!
     
    desilator, May 14, 2008 IP
    sarahk likes this.
  6. kingofsanda

    kingofsanda Peon

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    #26
    You should try to eat healthy and start exercising.
     
    kingofsanda, May 14, 2008 IP
  7. clark71822

    clark71822 Peon

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    #27
    Perhaps one good source of information in regards to diabetes is to go the American Diabetes Association website. They have a lot of information on the different types, as well as information on how to manage it. A very valuable resource.
     
    clark71822, May 14, 2008 IP
  8. itchyjr10

    itchyjr10 Peon

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    #28
    oh ok thanks:)
     
    itchyjr10, May 15, 2008 IP
  9. itchyjr10

    itchyjr10 Peon

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    #29
    i went to my doctor again there was a mistake... i only have type 1 is that good or bad
     
    itchyjr10, May 28, 2008 IP
  10. sarahk

    sarahk iTamer Staff

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    #30
    I'd rather have type 1 than 2 so I guess that's good.

    However you have alot of changes to make and lots to learn. Pay attention to the health professionals and don't "cheat".
     
    sarahk, May 28, 2008 IP
  11. desilator

    desilator Peon

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    #31
    Type 1 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce insulin.
    Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or your body does not properly use the insulin it makes.

    Im type 1 and would prefer to be type 2
     
    desilator, May 28, 2008 IP
  12. mohamedd

    mohamedd Active Member

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    #32
    Unfortunately type 1 tends to be a little more serious, but I have a friend who has it and he is fine. My best suggestion to you is to learn as much as you can about it to understand it. Ask you doctor to explain it to you. Dont be afraid to learn, and dont be frightened by it.

    Accept that you have it, accept that you have to make changes in your life style, and do so. Based upon your weight it must of been a virus that triggured your immune system to attack the beta producing insulin cells in the pancreas.

    There is no cure but again its ok if you make and stick with proper changes you will live a perfectly fine and normal life. :)

    for more info http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_mellitus_type_1
     
    mohamedd, May 28, 2008 IP
  13. jhuynh1026

    jhuynh1026 Peon

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    #33
    watch what you eat and drink. take care!
     
    jhuynh1026, May 29, 2008 IP
  14. itchyjr10

    itchyjr10 Peon

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    #34
    thanks alll
     
    itchyjr10, May 29, 2008 IP
  15. lovesource

    lovesource Guest

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    #35
    A Mediterranean diet can help ward off diabetes, according to new research that involved 13,000 people and took eight years to complete.

    The Spanish study found that a diet packed with fruit, vegetables and nuts can halve the risk of developing the Type 2 form of the condition.

    It follows others that have shown how eating like the Italians, Greeks, French and Spanish holds the secret to long life.

    An earlier study of 500,000 people carried out by the National Cancer Institute in America and the University of Cambridge over five years found that those who adhered to the diet cut the risk of dying early by a fifth.

    Evidence has also emerged this year that women who eat a Mediterranean diet while pregnant could protect their children against asthma and allergies.

    Prof Miguel Martinez-Gonzalez, of the University of Navarra, Pamplona, said his study could help provide "substantial protection" from Type 2 diabetes, which is the form most commonly suffered by the obese.

    Prof Martinez-Gonzalez said those wishing to experience the full benefits should consume plenty of olive oil, grains and fish but reduce their intake of meat, dairy products and alcohol.

    He said: "The major protective characteristics of the diet include a high intake of fibre and vegetable fat, a low intake of trans fatty acids, and a moderate intake of alcohol.

    "In addition, a key element of the diet is the abundant use of virgin oil for cooking, frying, spreading on bread and dressing salads."

    The study, published by the British Medical Journal, showed that by eating Mediterranean food even smokers and those with a family history of diabetes stood less chance of developing it than those who exhibited no other risk factors but did not follow the diet.
     
    lovesource, May 30, 2008 IP
  16. lovesource

    lovesource Guest

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    #36
    New Vaccine Approach Prevents, Reverses Diabetes In Lab Study
    ScienceDaily (May 29, 2008) — Microspheres carrying targeted nucleic acid molecules fabricated in the laboratory have been shown to prevent and even reverse new-onset cases of type 1 diabetes in animal models. The results of these studies were reported by diabetes researchers at the John G. Rangos Sr. Research Center at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

    In a research study at Children's Hospital, the scientists injected the microspheres under the skin near the pancreas of mice with autoimmune diabetes. The microspheres were then captured by white blood cells known as dendritic cells which released the nucleic acid molecules within the dendritic cells. The released molecules reprogrammed these cells, and then migrated to the pancreas. There, they turned off the immune system attack on insulin-producing beta cells. Within weeks, the diabetic mice were producing insulin again with reduced blood glucose levels.

    Results of the microsphere study are published in the June issue of Diabetes, the journal of the American Diabetes Association.

    In type 1 diabetes, T cells from the immune system travel to the pancreas and destroy beta cells, which produce insulin. The scientists -- led by Massimo Trucco, MD, and Nick Giannoukakis, PhD -- found that the microspheres reprogram dendritic cells to block the signaling mechanism that sends T cells to destroy beta cells. The microsphere research builds on previous research by Drs. Giannoukakis and Trucco in which they used dendritic cells delivered to the pancreas in another method to turn off the immune system's attack on insulin-producing beta cells, thereby allowing the cells of the pancreas to recover and begin producing insulin again.

    Drs. Trucco and Giannoukakis anticipate that the latest research involving microspheres represents a significant improvement over their previous approach to extract (through a process known as leukapheresis) and reprogram the dendritic cells.

    "The microspheres prevented the onset of type 1 diabetes and, most importantly, exhibited a capacity to reverse hyperglycemia, suggesting a potential to reverse type 1 diabetes in new-onset patients," said Dr. Trucco, chief of the Division of Immunogenetics at Children's. "This novel microsphere approach represents for the first time a vaccine with the potential to suppress and reverse diabetes. This finding holds true promise for clinical testing in people with type 1 diabetes."

    Currently, Drs. Trucco and Giannoukakis are conducting a clinical trial of their leukapheresis-based dendritic cell approach in humans at Children's. This Phase 1 clinical trial has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    "Our ultimate goal is to offer this dendritic cell vaccine or microsphere-based therapy to children at risk for or newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. We want to make the procedure as safe and comfortable as possible," Dr. Giannoukakis said.

    The trial began late last year and enrollment is ongoing. The study, which plans to enroll a total of 15 adults over age 18 with type 1 diabetes, is expected to conclude later this year.

    If the leukapheresis-based approach continues to show exceptional safety, the researchers hope to launch a national clinical trial that will assess the effectiveness of the dendritic cells in pediatric patients to prevent diabetes or reverse the disease right after it is clinically confirmed. At a later date, it is anticipated that Baxter Healthcare will collaborate with Drs. Trucco and Giannoukakis in a clinical trial utilizing the unique microsphere-based approach.

    Leukapheresis is a process that allows for the collection of dendritic cell precursors from the patients in the study, which takes two to four hours. After the precursors are collected, they are treated in the lab with specific growth factors that turn them into dendritic cells. The growth factors are also combined with short DNA sequences that specifically block the expression of molecules that are found at the surface of dendritic cells known as CD40, CD80 and CD86. Once these reprogrammed dendritic cells are tested in the lab, they are injected back into the patient. They then orchestrate an anti-diabetic effect by suppressing the activity of T-cells which are responsible for the impairment and destruction of the pancreatic insulin-producing cells.

    "Using microspheres will be much less invasive for the patient and much more efficient for clinicians. We wouldn't need to harvest a patient's dendritic cells, and it would eliminate the need to genetically reprogram the dendritic cells in a sterile, off-site facility. Instead, the patient would receive the microsphere injection with a small needle in a clinic setting in a matter of minutes," Dr. Giannoukakis said.

    The microsphere molecule delivery technology being used is Baxter Healthcare Corporation's PROMAXX microsphere technology. Larry Brown, ScD, Vice President, Research and Chief Technology Officer and Kimberly Gillis, PhD, Director of Research at Epic Therapeutics (Norwood, MA), part of Baxter's Medication Delivery business, worked with Drs. Giannoukakis and Trucco to develop the specific diabetes vaccine microspheres. The genetic reprogramming of dendritic cells is an approach developed by Drs. Giannoukakis and Trucco.

    Type 1 diabetes is regarded as an autoimmune disease because a person's immune system's T cells attack and destroy the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop over a short period of time and include increased thirst, frequent urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision and extreme fatigue. People with type 1 diabetes require numerous daily injections of insulin to survive. Type 1 diabetes also is known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or juvenile-onset diabetes. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reports that more than 1 million children and teenagers (age 19 and younger) have type 1 diabetes. According to the NIH, 5 percent to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes cases in the United States are type 1 diabetes.
     
    lovesource, May 30, 2008 IP
  17. lovesource

    lovesource Guest

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    #37
    Food education is key
    The Ottawa Citizen
    Published: Thursday, May 29, 2008

    Poor food choices can play a significant role in the development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Although hospitals should be providing healthy food choices, poor food choices are everywhere we look and are not going to disappear in the near future. Instead, health care workers can teach and educate their patients on not only healthy food choices but also on the other complex factors that contribute to obesity and related diseases before they are admitted to our hospitals.

    Our experience confirms this. We have provided patients that have been referred from their family physician the opportunity to participate in a six- month multidisciplinary (dietitian, endocrinologist, nurse, pharmacist) clinic. We recently published the results of our program that showed clinically significant changes in parameters such as blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, waist circumference and the bad cholesterol.
     
    lovesource, May 30, 2008 IP
  18. metprezi

    metprezi Peon

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    #38
    Itchyjr10,

    If you need a sugar substitute you might want to try stevia. That's what I use. I recently read about miracle fruit. Research it and see if that can help. Also, ask your doctor about carbohydrates. In my case, I have found them to be really the main responsible factor for raising my blood sugar. I try to limit my consumption of them to a minimum. That means being really careful about bread, white flour in general, potatoes, and others. Again, your doctor is the ultimate guide in that matter but that doesn't mean you can't do your own research. Sometimes, a particular physician might not be aware of a certain product because there is so much information out there and there is so much time a practitioner can dedicate to updating his knowledge. It's possible for you to come across an information your doctor hasn't had yet. The idea is to always submit your own findings to your health practitioner and get his or her opinion.
     
    metprezi, Jun 8, 2008 IP
  19. bagwell

    bagwell Peon

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    #39
    You should have your own doctor or atleast nurse who will give you really accurate info whenever you need you just call her or him.

    Do not relly on tips over Internet, it may harm you, as they are not always professional (articles etc) they may be good, but not worthy to relly on them. Professinal care needed.

    I know few people with type 1 and they have to get injections every day at exact same day, having food at exact same time or when they sugar drops under certain level in blood. Not good to eat anytime, or doing much physical work without having some backup sugar (can be some drink with sugar too), should be drinking ofter (water, not sugar things), but don't panic or don't be sad, people with diabetes have more healthy life due to diet and so on ;)
     
    bagwell, Jun 8, 2008 IP
  20. desilator

    desilator Peon

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    #40
    Also.. make sure you get a medic alert bracelet... may just safe your life if your in a public place by your self and your sugars get too low.
     
    desilator, Jun 20, 2008 IP