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is free ssl from zerossl.com worth?

Discussion in 'Search Engine Optimization' started by indiasbull, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. #1
    is free ssl from zerossl.com worth to use for long time or not ?

    i want to use for playwithhealth.com and keeptraffic.com
    SEMrush
     
    indiasbull, Oct 8, 2018 IP
    SEMrush
  2. SaleSmith

    SaleSmith Peon

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    #2
    If you need a signed certificate, use "let's encrypt". If you need generate a certificate, then use a program "openssl".
     
    SaleSmith, Oct 8, 2018 IP
  3. RSSeosolution

    RSSeosolution Active Member

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    #3
    I dont think because there are multiple type of SSL certificate ..... as you can see normally with color "Green" "Yellow". If some one is providing you free SSL then i am 100% sure that those SSL are not effective like other site is selling.

    Think once only that why its Free and why other selling for hundred dollar ;)
     
    RSSeosolution, Oct 9, 2018 IP
    indiasbull likes this.
  4. James Liyod

    James Liyod Member

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    #4
    One of the key parts of an SSL Certificate as proof of domain ownership is that it is signed with a private key, that you only have. If someone else were to obtain that private key, they could then create an SSL Certificates pretending to be you or revoke your existing certificates.


    In public key cryptography keys are inherently made in pairs, one "public " and other "private". Certificates are signed documents, which say that Issuer promises the Subject of the certificate has a private key which corresponds to the Public Key written down the certificate. The signature on the document is made using the private key belonging to the issuer which means that everyone who knows the Issuer's public key can check the signature is real. The certificate is not signed by the Subject, except in the special case of “self-signed” certificates, which have the exact same Issuer and Subject.


    For a typical web SSL cert, the Issuer might be Let’s Encrypt, the Subject might be and the Public Key might be a several hundred digit odd numbers (for the RSA algorithm most popularly used). This certificate would be signed by Let’s Encrypt, using Let’s Encrypts private key, which (because it is very important and mustn’t be stolen) is trapped inside a dedicated hardware device that knows how to sign certificates without any risk of revealing the key it is protecting.
     
    James Liyod, Oct 16, 2018 at 3:50 AM IP