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Increase Image Size without Losing Pixel Quality

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Bohol, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. #1
    Hi Friends,

    How do you increase an image size without sacrificing the quality of the photo itself? I will use Photoshop to increase image size. I want to retain the same quality from the original one. Please share your tips. Thank you.
    Bohol, Sep 10, 2008 IP
  2. Varelse

    Varelse Peon

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    #2
    There is no way you can increase the image size without quality loss at all. You can make it almost unnoticeable, but there always be some.
    Some people recommend +10% scaling up trick, but it won't let you scale up your image twice or so.
    Varelse, Sep 10, 2008 IP
  3. venue-hire

    venue-hire Peon

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    #3
    There are some apps specifically for resizing images which may give better results than Photoshop, but you will always lose some quality.
    venue-hire, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  4. Kerosene

    Kerosene Alpha & Omega™ Staff

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    #4
    Most of those resizing applications are a waste of time.

    The short answer is no, it can't be done unless you're using vector images.
    Kerosene, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  5. Bohol

    Bohol Peon

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    #5
    So, what is the best way to manipulate pictures that in resizing them for either smaller or bigger sizes the quality remains intact?

    Use a high resolution in scanning?
    Bohol, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  6. glitto

    glitto Peon

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    #6
    Yes, either the image should be higher resolution... or you can only increase or decrease the size of the image a little. But if you do more the quality will definitely decrease.
    glitto, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  7. amirsalmani

    amirsalmani Active Member

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    #7
    Well as per my experience, If you are resizing the image to small size then the quality would be fine, but if you are increasing the size then the quality must go....

    The only way to maintain the quality is a big image with high resolution..

    Thanks
    amirsalmani, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  8. raghav

    raghav Active Member

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    #8
    If you really want to make this possible , use photshop side by side while enlarging it

    > You have to keep on repairing the pixelised parts, once you keep on scalling it high.
    raghav, Sep 11, 2008 IP
  9. sax

    sax Member

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    #9
    Well, this is an old thread, I came here searching for the same stuff, but then I figured out a way (This is in Photoshop CS4)...

    Open the image you want to enlarge. Now create a New Image in Photoshop. Select everything (Ctrl+A) from the original image and paste it in the new Image.

    Now you can play with Image size. To keep the resolution high and keep the image size the same, change the resolution first, and then change the width and height as you want it to be. Keep Resample Image to Bicubic Smoother (best for enlargement).

    You should have it now.
    sax, Jun 16, 2011 IP
  10. ChanderBedi

    ChanderBedi Peon

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    #10
    Select photo then click alt and shift button then drag with mouse ...
    ChanderBedi, Jun 23, 2011 IP
  11. salikkhan

    salikkhan Greenhorn

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    #11
    you can also use the re size option on the photoshop cs4, with that you can change the size of the pic
    salikkhan, Jun 23, 2011 IP
  12. Captivano

    Captivano Greenhorn

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    #12
    Im agree with this method. After that I usually double the layer. Then I changed the top layer to soft light blend. Then give the filter-> other -> highpass.
    Captivano, Jul 12, 2011 IP
  13. Georgia Nikolova

    Georgia Nikolova Guest

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    #13
    you have to try photozoom pro ... ;)
    Georgia Nikolova, Jul 28, 2011 IP
  14. Clones

    Clones Member

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    #14
    Picassa is the best tool for this search on google :)
    Clones, Oct 4, 2011 IP
  15. jonnycover

    jonnycover Peon

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    #15
    After resizing you can apply some Surface Blur on the picture and maybe some Unsharpen mask. But it still doesnt help so much.
    jonnycover, Oct 4, 2011 IP
  16. ApocalypseXL

    ApocalypseXL Notable Member

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    #16
    I still have a customer that for the past 2 years has been searching for a powerful enough software to magnify several photos and despite the fact that we archived some amazing magnification levels (multiple professionals worked on this) there is a certain level beyond which no algorithm can pass . So unless you're photo is the one of a target just go with vectors .
    ApocalypseXL, Oct 4, 2011 IP
  17. prior-reed

    prior-reed Peon

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    #17
    Image file size—expressed as the number of bytes—increases with the number of pixels composing an image, and the colour depth of the pixels. The greater the number of rows and columns, the greater the image resolution, and the larger the file. Also, each pixel of an image increases in size when its colour depth increases—an 8-bit pixel (1 byte) stores 256 colors, a 24-bit pixel (3 bytes) stores 16 million colors, the latter known as truecolor.

    Image compression uses algorithms to decrease the size of a file. High resolution cameras produce large image files, ranging from hundreds of kilobytes to megabytes, per the camera's resolution and the image-storage format capacity. High resolution digital cameras record 12 megapixel (1MP = 1,000,000 pixels / 1 million) images, or more, in truecolor. For example, an image recorded by a 12 MP camera; since each pixel uses 3 bytes to record truecolor, the uncompressed image would occupy 36,000,000 bytes of memory—a great amount of digital storage for one image, given that cameras must record and store many images to be practical. Faced with large file sizes, both within the camera and a storage disc, image file formats were developed to store such large images.
    prior-reed, Oct 23, 2011 IP
  18. Safeer

    Safeer Greenhorn

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    #18
    Picassa is the best tool for this
    Safeer, Oct 26, 2011 IP
  19. masato_sn

    masato_sn Peon

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    #19
    I think you can resample the image up to 200% (twice) without seeing a big difference in quality, if larger you'll be noticed quality degradation
    masato_sn, Oct 28, 2011 IP
  20. axemgm

    axemgm Peon

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    #20
    Step 1: In Adobe Photoshop, choose Image>Image Size. TIP: In Photoshop CS2, just press Command-Option-I (PC: Control-Alt-I).
    Step 2: At the bottom of the dialog, uncheck Resample Image. This all-powerful magic option locks the number of pixels contained in the image, thereby locking the quality. Enter 300 into the Resolution field and look what happens:
    [​IMG]
    The image is now 300 ppi and the physical size has decreased to about 10.5×7.5 inches. See how the physical dimensions of the image changed but the pixel information didn’t? I have exactly the same number of pixels I started out with: 3136×2352; they’re just packed more tightly together. Furthermore, notice how the file size didn’t change at all? It’s still 21 MB, as evidenced in the document window and in the Image Size dialog (another clue that the pixel data didn’t change). I haven’t changed the quality (pixels), I’ve just changed the measurement (dpi), which only affects the printed image.
    Admittedly, this is confusing because the onscreen image didn’t change a bit (see earlier paragraph on monitors, eyeballs, and brains). The truth is only revealed by the Image Size dialog.
    The thing to remember is that as long as you uncheck the Resample Image box, you can tweak the resolution ’til the cows come home and you won’t alter the image quality at all. Ever. If you leave the Resample Image box checked, you’ll be practicing a dark magic called upsampling, wherein you’re adding pixels (data) to the image that weren’t originally there. It’s usually a very bad idea; unless, of course, you’re in a real pickle or you’re going for that chunky look in your design.
    axemgm, Nov 30, 2011 IP