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How do you write a salespage?

Discussion in 'Copywriting' started by mindmember, Aug 27, 2011.

  1. bacit

    bacit Greenhorn

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    #21
    the basic thumb rule to write a sales page is
    become a customer first and then think like a customer
    if you think like a potential buyers you can easily make out the loop holes that requires attention, and how to present a product or service
    SEMrush
    once you chalk out your way then start writing a sales pitch
     
    bacit, Mar 1, 2012 IP
    SEMrush
  2. Charismatic Mannequin

    Charismatic Mannequin Greenhorn

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    #22

    It makes me laugh to hear you say that, Spoiltdiva. If you knew some of the copywriters I knew, you'd bite your tongue. Any good copywriter is booked up solid for months in advance. Why? Because if you can get people's products/services sold and make them huge profits, you're a wanted man.

    In regard to the OP, there is no 'section' guideline to copy. I don't know where you got that from, but I'd drop it quickly. Otherwise your copy will end up just like everyone else's rubbish on the internet. If you're strapped for cash, and can't afford to hire a copywriter (we're an expensive bunch, for sure) then you need to invest in some reading material.

    Check my list at this thread (should give you some ideas on what books to read and study - focus particularly on Dan Kennedy's Ultimate Sales letters and Joseph Sugarman's book as they're great for beginners):

    forums.digitalpoint[dot]com/showthread.php?t=2411822


    Regards,


    Ben Palmer-Wilson
    -------------------
    Freelance Copywriter
     
    Charismatic Mannequin, Mar 1, 2012 IP
  3. Spoiltdiva

    Spoiltdiva Illustrious Member

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    #23
    @Charismatic Mannequin
    Fair enough,but if good copywriters are so busy,how on earth do you find time to come on here and post?:)
     
    Spoiltdiva, Mar 1, 2012 IP
  4. Charismatic Mannequin

    Charismatic Mannequin Greenhorn

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    #24
    Heh, you make a good point, one to which I will respond with two points of my own:1.) I don't work 24/7, as some might believe. No one can work 24/7, without burning themselves out. Believe me, I've tried.2.) Everyone has to start somewhere. Even the best of copywriters didn't start out being famous and incredibly good at their craft. They had to build up to the point where they no longer needed to market themselves, but simply had people coming to them from everywhere. Slow and steady wins the race. :)
     
    Charismatic Mannequin, Mar 2, 2012 IP
  5. markinternet

    markinternet Member

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    #25
    model other successful copywriters and get ideas and look at how they structure things and the words they use
     
    markinternet, Mar 7, 2012 IP
  6. Sam Gilmore

    Sam Gilmore Peon

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    #26
    [h=2]1. What's In It For Me?[/h]This may sound rude, but nobody cares what you think. Nobody cares about your company history or your products--until you make them care. Most website copy is focused on the business instead of the visitor. In order to get the visitor interested enough to stay on the page, the copy must be focused on them. How? Read through all the copy and highlight every time you see the words "I" or "our" or "we" and see if you can change them to "you" or "your".
    Instead of: "Our product makes housework easier."
    Try: "You'll breeze through your housework in half the time with the Acme Insta-Clean."
    [h=2]2. What's The Problem?[/h]Every product or service sets out to solve a problem. It gets out dirt; it quenches thirst; it does taxes in half the time. But too many businesses never spell out the problem in their copy, so the visitor sighs "that's nice" and hits the back button. Good copy paints a picture of the problem so it agitates the visitor and captures his attention.
    Instead of: "We clean your floors."
    Try: "Are you sick of spending hours of back-breaking work just to keep your floors clean?"
    [h=2]3. What's The Solution?[/h]Once you've presented the problem and captured the visitor's attention, you need to present the solution. Paint pictures. Explain in vivid detail how an Insta-Clean will save them time and energy and money and anything else you can think of. Always present the solution in terms of benefits, not features.
    Instead of: "Acme Insta-Clean has a patented steam clean system."
    Try: "Stubborn carpet stains melt away easily with its patented steam clean system."
    [h=2]4. Why You?[/h]Once you've established that there's a solution, now you need to explain why your solution is the best one. It's highly unlikely your solution is the only one around. So, you have to give the visitor a reason to buy from you instead of someone else. Is your solution cheaper or faster? Are you local? Do you have 125 years of experience in the cleaning business? Give them a compelling reason (or ten) to hit that order button.
    [h=2]5. Social Proof[/h]People rarely act alone. It's a huge risk to buy from you, unless there's proof that other people have purchased from you and had a great experience. Social proof means that you've demonstrated that other people "just like me" have purchased and enjoyed a certain product. Or that lots of people have had great results using your service. Testimonials, reviews and case studies are the most common forms of social proof.
    You don't need dozens of testimonials, sometimes just one will do the trick. But generally the more you can show positive results for other people, the more sales you'll make.
    [h=2]6. Risk Reversal[/h]No one likes to take a risk. And ordering anything online is a big risk. Is the shopping cart secure? Will my credit card be charged twice? Will I get unsolicited email? What if I want to make a return? The brain can come up with loads of risk-related objections. So, do your best to eliminate as much risk as possible. The easiest way to do that is with a money-back guarantee, but that's not always possible. Something as simple as a testimonial saying "I was so happy to get a real person on the phone to help me with my order" can go a long way to reducing risk in the mind of the visitor.
    [h=2]7. Call To Action[/h]Every single page on a website should have a call to action. The most obvious type is asking for a sale. But it doesn't always have to be "buy now." It could be to call you. It could be to send an email. It could be to click and view a video.
    A call to action is simply telling the visitor what to do next. They need to be directed through your site so they eventually take the desired end action. Make sure every piece of copy has some sort of direction or call to action that tells the reader where to go next. A simple link is fine, but tell them where they're going and why.
    [h=2]8. Skim & Scan[/h]Good design is easy on the eyes, and so is good copy. When your visitor first lands on the page, they don't start reading from the top to the bottom. They skim and scan to see if the page contains the information they're looking for. Only about 10% of the copy on a webpage is read by the visitor. So it's really important to get your point across quickly. Short paragraphs and bolded subheads help people skim and scan. Really good copy will tell the story (and make the sale) using nothing more than the headline and subheads.
    [h=2]9. Quick Decision Makers[/h]Every visitor has his or her own personality, and it may not match your personality. Many people coming to your site will be quick decision makers. They want to know what it is, why they need it and how much it costs. And they want to know in under 10 seconds. So, for these people, you need to put the most important information above the fold. In other words, make sure they don't have to scroll down to get a complete picture of what you're offering. You'll also want to put any opt-in forms or order buttons above the fold, too.
    [h=2]10. Slow Decision Makers[/h]For those personalities who are slow decision makers, you need to explain things in great detail. These people are the methodical personalities. They want to know what the steps are, how it works, what happens when they order. Writing the process out in a step-by-step manner satisfies their need to know all the facts before making a decision. They don't mind reading a lot of text, so don't be afraid to spell out everything in great detail. Of course, you can also use links, videos and info-graphics to do some of the explaining for you.
     
    Sam Gilmore, Mar 16, 2012 IP
  7. seeworld

    seeworld Guest

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    #27
    which tipe of sale page clickbank or what?
     
    seeworld, Mar 19, 2012 IP
  8. axxil

    axxil Member

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    #28
    Hiya,
    I certainly don't care to duplicate my posts. I've put this on another thread but it for sure is relevant here as well. Other replies have kind of touched on what I'm about to tell you, but not said it exactly, so far as I can see.

    Find the kind of sales page that makes you think: 'I wish I'd written that.' Then copy it out by hand. Get in the habit of doing this. Here's one good reference on the method of working I just mentioned: http://copyhour.com/secret
    Good luck. With this under your belt you won't need much luck as such...
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
    axxil, Mar 24, 2013 IP
  9. axxil

    axxil Member

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    #29
    Here's a tip which has been successful for me and lots of top marketers too. Imagine you're addressing your remarks to someone you actually know who needs the service you're promoting. This should not only speed things but have you produce something that gets good fast results. Good luck.

    Remember, you aren't writing for a generalised audience. Direct what you're writing at this one persoon...
     
    axxil, Mar 29, 2013 IP
  10. Jomuli3

    Jomuli3 Guest

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    #30
    Copywriters have different approaches to writing persuasive sales letters. What one might think is the best way could be viewed differently by another --- though the principles could be the same.

    One other thing --- there is so much to go into a good copy. It is not possible to mention everything here because this is not a copywriting course.

    Aaaah! may be you should seriously consider taking up a course. You could look for a mentor too.

    In short let me add on to what others have already given you.

    A successful or highly persuasive sales-boosting letter should have an eye catching headline. It could be one that raises curiosity or desire.

    It should have a strong promise that is unquestionably proven.

    With a closing good proposition it should be strong.

    What goes inside?

    Many copywriters lack the skill to compel their prospects to read on. There are various ways to do this in your copy. One of them is ' open hooks.' Done by not completing what you mention --- until a later stage.

    You could choose various emotions to weave in your sales letter to raise desire.

    Do market and product research.

    Find out your competition. Position your product differently. Punch holes in your competitors' areas of strength.

    Craft sales increasing bullets.

    Write as if you were speaking to a friend.

    Find out reasons why your prospects would want your product.

    Go beyond features and benefits. Figure out deeper 'earth - moving' reasons why people buy.

    Find out what objections could arise and possibly destroy them before they do using one powerful technique of viewing things from your prospects' angle.

    In a pictorial manner show them the nightmare that might haunt them, if they don't purchase your product or service. Do the opposite too.

    As I mention earlier on, this isn't a copywriting training program.

    There is more to writing a good copy than I have outlined here.
     
    Jomuli3, Apr 16, 2013 IP
  11. huake00

    huake00 Greenhorn

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    #31
    Wordpress and nice theme and SEO PLUGIN,THAT IS ALL!
     
    huake00, Apr 23, 2013 IP
  12. aditd

    aditd Well-Known Member

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    #32
    Quite similar to the quote:
    This what I do sometimes: I take an idea an write anything I know about it. This helps me to actually write about something AND also understand better what I wrote there.
    I say this because many things are written in a copy/paste matter and the end user ... it's quite immune to the articles.
     
    aditd, May 3, 2013 IP