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How do I contact google with a complaint?

Discussion in 'Google' started by aditne, Nov 9, 2008.

  1. smileverse

    smileverse Peon

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    #21
    You can contact google through their help center. And you need to select the category which your complaint belongs to. There will be a online contact form to email google (but not the Email address). Go through here: http://support.google.com
    SEMrush
     
    smileverse, Feb 8, 2012 IP
    SEMrush
  2. rakeshgvt

    rakeshgvt Peon

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    #22
    there is so many google offices around the world and so many complaint mail id so i want u to ask u which type of your complaint..
     
    rakeshgvt, Feb 9, 2012 IP
  3. Herpsy

    Herpsy Member

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    #23
    it was not GOOGLE you went too it was goggle.com. a common misspelling. Go there, there is no virus or spyware on the website, there is a tracking cookie but that is not hard to get rid of. The issue was your stupidity. Most google will do is take the domain off the offenders for squatting
     
    Herpsy, Feb 9, 2012 IP
  4. Alex5643

    Alex5643 Peon

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    #24
    Sorry for my english. Where can I complain about rudeness from the moderator of Google support? When I wrote about it on their forum, the same person answered me. In a personal message, he added that I just do not know who he is.
     
    Alex5643, Jun 24, 2017 IP
  5. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #25
    You can't. They are not Google staff.
    Just because someone was rude and you got come butt hurt from that .... move on.
     
    Agent000, Jun 24, 2017 IP
  6. pacman000

    pacman000 Peon

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    #26
    This has bothered me for some time. You can't ask Google's owners/operators a question; you can only ask a volunteer. How are they supposed to know what really goes on in the search giant?
     
    pacman000, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  7. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #27
    1. How much are you paying Google in the expectation that they will answer your questions?
    2. What business is it of yours "what really goes on in the search giant?"?
     
    Agent000, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  8. pacman000

    pacman000 Peon

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    #28
    "1. How much are you paying Google in the expectation that they will answer your questions?
    2. What business is it of yours 'what really goes on in the search giant?'?"

    1) Nothing, except my time and views, obviously. ;) I'd expect a large public company to have a way to communicate with the public directly, on a one-on-one basis if need be. It's just good customer service. Offloading that onto volunteers is off-putting. Google isn't a couple of Stanford graduate students running an experiment anymore; they should be responsible for their own customer service. I don't pay my local broadcast TV stations anything, except views, but I can still write them a letter at the very least.

    2) A great deal. I use their service to answer questions (nearly) daily. I need to know what goes on in the search giant to know that I'm receiving accurate answers. Same as any other information-related service.
     
    pacman000, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  9. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #29
    You have a very deluded perception of reality. You are NOT a customer. Only customers get 'customer service'. Customers are the ones that pay $. How much are you paying to be a customer?
    There is a reason that Goole does not provide that service! .... and its the same reason that NO company does not provide a 'customer service' to those who are not customers.

    (I have no trouble getting Google on the phone and getting questions answered related to the service that I am a customer of theirs for ... ie Adwords)
    But what 'customer service' do you get from them? Their customers are the ones that pay (ie the advertiser). Of course you can write to them ... and you can write to Google if you want. Just don't expect them to take any notice.
     
    Agent000, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  10. hiuufji

    hiuufji Active Member

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    #30
    yes also they have phone support for gsuit paid member
     
    hiuufji, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  11. pacman000

    pacman000 Peon

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    #31
    Thank you for your response. I must admit I've been a bit blue since DMOZ closed, and ScrubTheWeb's recent closure hasn't helped. That may have distorted my view of the world a bit. "Deluded," however, is an emotionally charged word; mistaken would be better for polite, constructive, conversation.

    Now to the question at hand: Am I a Google customer? I know I use their services regularly, but, you're right, that doesn't make me a customer. A customer, by definition, is "one that purchases a commodity or service." (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/customer) I know Google's provided services to me, but have I purchased them? I've agreed to Google's terms of service; terms of service agreements are usually contracts. A contract needs four things to be valid: it needs to be for something legal, it needs at least two parties with the capacity to enter a contract, it needs an agreement between those parties, and it needs consideration. Google's offered a set of services and I've agreed to accept them. So there’s one part of a contract right there, but that alone doesn't make a contract; there needs to be consideration, "something of value received or promised." (Business Law Text and Cases, Clarkson, Miller, Cross.) What I've gotten is obvious; I've gotten access to a Google's services. But for this to be a valid contract Google needs consideration too. What has Google gotten from this agreement? "By using our Services, you agree that Google can use such data in accordance with our privacy policies." (https://www.google.com/policies/terms/) So Google has consideration too; as long as I have the capacity to enter a contract and Google's Terms don't violate any laws, yeah, I've entered a contract with Google.
    Let's review the definition of customer again: "one that purchases a commodity or service." Now, that doesn't include a reference to creating a contract, but a contract does involve an exchange of goods and/or services, since both parties must get consideration. Doesn't a purchase involve an exchange? Yes, to purchase something is "to obtain by paying money or its equivalent." (Emphasis added.)
    (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/purchase) That "or its equivalent" part's important; I can purchase a service without giving money to the service. All I need to do is give the service provider something they consider equivalent to money, like rights to "analyze your content (including emails) to provide you personally relevant product features, such as customized search results, tailored advertising [emphasis added], and spam and malware detection." (https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/) In short, by using Google's services, I've entered a contract with Google; I've exchanged rights for the ability to use their services. That's a purchase, and that makes me a customer.

    I don’t request an instant response from Google; I just wish their contact information wasn’t buried so deep in their structure.
     
    pacman000, Jun 29, 2017 IP
  12. Agent000

    Agent000 Notable Member

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    #32
    Nope. There is a reason that Google does not provide that service. Can you contact Bing, DuckDuckGo, etc over the same issues? There is also a reason that they do not provide that same service too.
     
    Agent000, Jun 29, 2017 IP
  13. pacman000

    pacman000 Peon

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    #33
    No. But I could (and did) contact ScrubTheWeb. If they're too small to count, a link to InfoSpace's contact form is displayed on the main page of their site(s.) http://infospace.com/contact/index.html. Same with Ask. http://www.ask.com/ Most major companies have a public contact form.

    That Google, Microsoft, and DuckDuckGo don't want to deal with crank callers and spam is obvious; no one wants to deal with that. At the same time they operate major companies. It is both improper and unprofessional to cut off communications with the public at large. If other major companies can provide contact information without being overrun with spam, Google can too.

    I like most of what you've written about DMOZ, but I cannot with you agree on this. Many thanks for responding again. :)
     
    pacman000, Jun 29, 2017 IP