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Google bought adsense.com?

Discussion in 'Google' started by cottoncandy, Nov 6, 2006.

  1. SEMrush
  2. slider

    slider Peon

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    #2
    I don't even know who owned it before. :p
     
    slider, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  3. w3bmaster

    w3bmaster Notable Member

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    #3
    Lol i think they owned it from the start
     
    w3bmaster, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  4. mihaidamianov

    mihaidamianov Well-Known Member

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    #4
    No they didn't. It was a totally different site there a few months ago
     
    mihaidamianov, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  5. cottoncandy

    cottoncandy Peon

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    #5
    Nope! Check google cache if you don't want to believe me.
     
    cottoncandy, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  6. Brennan

    Brennan Notable Member

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    #6
    Adsense.com use to be owned by Adsense Consulting and displayed the message "If you think you can get rich quick placing other people's ads on your site or blog, please contact Google who has taken and used our business name without permission or compensation." on their homepage. Google have now bought the domain but Adsense Consulting haven't said how much it was purchased for.
     
    Brennan, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  7. Winagain

    Winagain Well-Known Member

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    #7
    Yes, they bought it:
    Registrant:
    Google Inc. (DOM-1550091)
    1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View CA 94043 US

    Domain Name: adsense.com

    Registrar Name: Markmonitor.com
    Registrar Whois: whois.markmonitor.com
    Registrar Homepage: http://www.markmonitor.com

    Administrative Contact:
    DNS Admin (NIC-14290820) Google Inc.
    1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View CA 94043 US
    +1.6506234000 Fax- +1.6506188571
    Technical Contact, Zone Contact:
    DNS Admin (NIC-14290820) Google Inc.
    1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View CA 94043 US

    I would've sell it for a bundle!
     
    Winagain, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  8. kevinn

    kevinn Active Member

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    #8
    Wow, must of been recent, I was on that site about 2 weeks ago and it was the original company. Cool find!
     
    kevinn, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  9. Connections

    Connections Well-Known Member

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    #9
    hhaha yeah their were a few threads about this site on this forum,

    I wonder what happened with it? Or the price ti was sold at =)

    any mroe info like this?
     
    Connections, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  10. Winagain

    Winagain Well-Known Member

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    #10
    One article on wired.com said they sold it to cover the costs to change stationary, business cards and such.

    That would of been the worst business decision ever.
    If they talked with somebody at DP forums, they would've known the domain is work a small fortune.
     
    Winagain, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  11. aramiK

    aramiK Peon

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    #11
    But seriously, who doesn't know what Google is....
     
    aramiK, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  12. urbanstereotype

    urbanstereotype Peon

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    #12
    yeah they JUST bought it, adsense.com refused to disclose for how much they sold it, but they were getting pissed off with the amount of bandwidth they were losing from people looking for google adsense.
    if it was me, i would have put adsense ads on the site ;)
     
    urbanstereotype, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  13. malique

    malique Peon

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    #13
    that domain is worth the cost of reprinting letterheads,namecards,stationarys?
    Oh my freaking lord. They should have consulted some domain expert. Or even the kid next door! This is the worse compensation ive ever read about.
     
    malique, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  14. Alvin

    Alvin Notable Member

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    #14
    no you cannot put adsense on that domain....
     
    Alvin, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  15. MrPoloShirt

    MrPoloShirt Peon

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    #15
    MrPoloShirt, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  16. ye.zero

    ye.zero Peon

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    #16
    Another ridiculous comment from someone naive... If the original company actually put up Adsense ads on adsense.com, they would've been liable for a multi-million dollar lawsuit from Google.

    I've read stupid posts from members about the company UTube.com putting up ads to video sites... same thing happens. It doesn't matter WHEN a similar domain was registered, as long as ONE site uploaded similar content to the other, they violate the DMCA and can be sued for big bucks.

    I don't know if you know the lawsuit that lasted a decade or so.
    Nissan vs. Nissan

    Nissan.com (a small computer family based business) was sued by Nissan Motors claiming copyright infringement, despite it being registered BEFORE the motor company changed its name from Datsun to Nissan.

    After a long battle, the ruling was in the computer company's favor, however, one of the conditions on the win was:

    1. No advertisement/pictures/content about cars can be placed on the site.

    Companies such as Utube.com and Adsense.com are not stupid enough to much around. They'll gladly give up their domains for $8.95 instead of receiving a lawsuit from the big boys.
     
    ye.zero, Nov 6, 2006 IP
    MrPoloShirt likes this.
  17. urbanstereotype

    urbanstereotype Peon

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    #17
    oh dear lord, i was joking!! in reference to the adsense lawsuit possibility!
     
    urbanstereotype, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  18. Connections

    Connections Well-Known Member

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    #18
    I would have sold it for big money, not sold it for "stationary" costs thats just a instance of google ripping some one off hard, they pay a stupid amount for yotube yet they cant even throw a few million to the adsense.com owners?

    WTF LOL......
     
    Connections, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  19. Connections

    Connections Well-Known Member

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    #19
    AdSense.com owner Alexis Garrett has revealed not only is he fed up with Google and all the phone calls he receives from people who want Google AdSense support, but also he has sold off the AdSense.com name for an undisclosed amount.

    The domain sale was made in September 2005, just slightly under a year after Google declined an offer to purchase the AdSense.com domain from Garrett. While she will not disclose the purchaser of the domain, the purchaser takes control in September 2006. Interesting, though, she claims she sold the domain for a price that "covers expenses incurred from having to replace things like company stationery, brochures and business cards". She states she sold it through a broker, but I am quite certain she could have sold it for many times more than that figure by selling on the open market.

    It also raises the point of trademark. Google owns the AdSense trademark. If a new business sets up shop on AdSense.com with something that works off of the Google trademark, whether it is a resource site or competing against Google, there is the possibility that the new owner could lose the domain.

    The article also mentions that AdSense.com's application for AdSense was denied, which could be for several reasons, including the trademark policy (disallowing AdSense from appearing on a domain with a Google trademarked term) or because the site had a definite lack of content.

    AdSense.com is still currently in Garrett's control, although she is in the process of converting it all over to her new domain... AdSense2.com. And AdSense.com sports the following "If you think you can get rich quick placing other people's ads on your site or blog, please contact Google who has taken and used our business name without permission or compensation."

    And it will be interesting to watch in September to see just what shows up at AdSense.com and how Google will handle the new owner with whatever the end purpose of the domain becomes. While Garrett stated a clause in the domain sale stated the domain could not show "gambling, adult content or actions that are "questionably ethical"", that remains to be seen.

    http://www.jensense.com/archives/2006/07/owners_of_adsen.html



    The owners of the domain adsense.com have been fielding hundreds of customer service e-mails and phone calls regarding Google's AdSense program since the advertising service launched in March 2003.

    Unfortunately for the domain registrants, they have no connection with Google, except for the fact that they happen to share the name.

    Alexis Garrett, marketing director and co-founder of AdSense Consulting, a Eugene, Oregon-based marketing and design company, registered the URL in 1996. Call the number listed until recently on adsense.com, and she'll likely answer the phone. But she'd rather you didn't, unless you're an actual prospective customer.

    "I don't want hundreds of people calling me," Garrett said. "I just want the two or three that are a good match for the services we provide. This has been overwhelming."

    On an afternoon in late May, Garrett said she had already fielded five Google AdSense calls.

    For Garrett's AdSense -- a company with three full-time employees and housed in a small brick office building -- the barrage of misdirected communication recently reached a tipping point: She sold the domain in September 2005 through a private broker to an as-yet-unnamed buyer.

    The new owner won't take over adsense.com until around September 2006. In the meantime, a placeholder redirects customers to the company's new site. Both old and new sites feature a bitter message in italics: "If you think you can get rich quick placing other people's ads on your site or blog, please contact Google who has taken and used our business name without permission or compensation."

    Google would not comment on questions about the Oregon-based company, except to confirm it did not buy the domain name adsense.com.

    Regarding problems Google has caused the small company, Google's AdSense representative Brandon McCormick said, "I just don't have anything to say on it."

    When Google's website-relevant ad service launched in 2003, Garrett wasn't totally put off, even though it had the same name and spelling as the company she co-created.

    "At first I thought, 'OK, maybe it won't be a bad thing. Maybe it will bring me business, it will raise the awareness of my word, of my name,'" she said.

    Actually, the opposite has happened. Due to an influx of, at one point, thousands of spam messages a day, she felt forced to remove her site's e-mail link from clients' web pages. She has lost business, she said, by way of busy phone lines, inadvertently trashed e-mails and distraction from her business.

    "I'm spending so much time telling people what we do not do instead of what we do do, and that is costly," she said.

    Sick of those losses, Garrett sold the domain for an undisclosed amount that she said covers expenses incurred from having to replace things like company stationery, brochures and business cards. She said she doesn't know who bought the domain, but that a clause in the sale contract stipulated it could not be used for anything related to gambling, adult content or actions that are "questionably ethical."

    Garrett said she did ask Google representatives if they wanted to buy the domain. They declined by e-mail in November 2004. But Google's apparent disinterest is tempered by the fact that it owns similar domains, including adsense.net and adwords.com.

    AdSense Consulting's new domain is adsense2.com -- and that simple change, made about a month ago, has cut down on a lot of the mistaken-identity issues, Garrett said.

    Garrett said she considered taking legal action against Google, but couldn't afford to pay lawyers. She said she hasn't ruled out a lawsuit, though.

    AdSense does not hold a federal trademark on its name, while Google does. Garrett did, however, register the name with the Oregon Secretary of State's Office, which is required for Oregon businesses registered under names different from their owners'.

    Twila Coakley, manager of business registration for the Oregon Secretary of State's Office, said that while the registration doesn't necessarily equal ownership of the name, it's a good record to have if there's a dispute over who has the right to use the name.

    "The courts often look at who used it first," she said, although the outcome of a case is never completely predictable.

    Not registering a trademark with the federal registry doesn't mean a business is powerless, said Corynne McSherry, a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. But that can make it difficult to go after a business that has the same name trademarked.

    "If you have an unregistered mark you've been using for years and someone else has a registered mark, you might pursue an unfair-competition claim," she said.

    In an attempt to take advantage of the windfall of attention to her site, Garrett said she tried to sign up adsense.com for Google's AdSense program about a year and a half ago. Ironically, her site was rejected, she said.

    "It basically said my site didn't meet their qualifications to participate in the AdSense program," she said.
     
    Connections, Nov 6, 2006 IP
  20. trichnosis

    trichnosis Prominent Member

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    #20
    oh my god , i think that somebody owned it.
     
    trichnosis, Nov 7, 2006 IP