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COM or NEW gTLDs ?

Discussion in 'Domain Names' started by gigalicious, Mar 20, 2014.

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COM or new gTLDs ?

  1. COM

    5 vote(s)
    55.6%
  2. new gTLDs

    4 vote(s)
    44.4%
  1. #1
    I believe this is not a new topic over all these years here but i see more and more find interesting the idea of gTLDs as a new goldmine (maybe due to the fact that some registrars try to present that way) .

    I'm and old supporter of type-in domains.
    Even now type-in turns to be translated as to what your wrote at google search field and not at browser bar, it's significant to remember that domains are the door for our customer/visitor and not a selection of excitement when we see the word "available" to the registrar's results.

    I'm a fan of COMs not because i try to "protect" my portfolio or anything but as i said at another topic i believe at the power of user awareness to domain suffixes and not at the trend companies try to pass.

    I never saw a campaign to say for example that www is not required for a domain name so that people can shorten their key strokes. Even me i can't get updated with so many new gTLDs. If someone tell me go and find my site to site.anything i will type it
    SEMrush
    Recently i started a new effort to help low budget domain owners to sell and appraise their domains at fiverr. New gTLDs can't be appraised. There are no criteria, no sales volume, no SEO results, nothing.

    Another issue is the TLD typos. Browser companies will help to this recognizing the active new gTLDs and correct them or ICANN will charge less to get gTLDs typos without the application cost ?

    Feel free to write your opinion
     
    gigalicious, Mar 20, 2014 IP
    SEMrush
  2. Rado_ch

    Rado_ch Well-Known Member

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    #2
    I think a lot of time will pass until someone comes even close to the .com extensions and it will certainly not be this new batch of TLDs. On an individual level one might have a great domain idea and really make it work, bringing value to it and all, but generally speaking the new TLDs are just of waste of time (still!). I would be much more interested to see how they develop in time, because right now everyone is blinded by the overhypes from the registrars. Its like standing in a line on the edge of an empty pool and waiting to see who jumps first :D
     
    Rado_ch, Mar 20, 2014 IP
  3. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #3
    Adding to the pool metaphor that there is none with a bikini standing at the line
     
    gigalicious, Mar 20, 2014 IP
  4. FrankDomains

    FrankDomains Peon

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    #4
    Like it or not - I think the new gTLDs are here to stay. .COM is getting full - names are getting harder and harder to find, and the sheer amount of money that registries have invested in the new gTLDs shows that the big investors are puting their money behind it.
    I do think it's going to be a while before they are in common usage though - It will probably take one of the big boys to kick start the interest (it will be interesting to see what happens when we see the first advert with amazon.shop on it)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014
    FrankDomains, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  5. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #5
    With yearly maintenance costs, marketing, ads, staff and several others we will see great gTLD collapse. It looks like the majority of them didn't even do their homework. The niche some of them target is so small that they need to have 100% coverage of it to sustain the gTLD .guru and .berlin are doing great but that doesn't mean anything. I wouldn't invest to new gTLDs for a new business. I don't want to be the one that will educate my visitors what they will type at their browser or risk to get the traffic the relevant .com. Give them 5 - 10 years and then we will have data to extract safe results.
     
    gigalicious, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  6. TIEro

    TIEro Active Member

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    #6
    The advantage of the old TLDs is simplicity. They're brief, they're easy and there were only 3 real options to worry about: if you typed in site.com and didn't get what you expected, you could try .org and .net - one of them would be the right one.

    The more TLDs that are added, the harder it gets to gather all the appropriate mis-remembered addresses. In my mind, that simply makes the original 3 even more valuable and the new ones even less interesting.

    One of the basic rules of dev work is to never underestimate the stupidity of the user: if they can break it, they will. Hundreds more TLDs simply means more broken connections, IMHO.
     
    TIEro, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  7. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #7
    They all forget the visitor's preference and i highly doubt that the majority of internet users will be able to properly type the new gTLDs. I still see as i said in older threads a LOT of users to think the domain is wrong if it doesn't include the www part. Try tell them tham that they also don't have to fill the .com/.net suffix. gTLDs is a nice trend but not for serious business right now. Let's see if this topic will be raised after 5 years with more info
     
    gigalicious, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  8. Rado_ch

    Rado_ch Well-Known Member

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    #8
    We don't have to actually wait so many years to see if the hype will sustain. After the first year or two, the registrars would have to draw the line and determine if the TLD is profitable enough or they should drop it altogether. There are tons of new extensions that are so peculiar and weird that I doubt they will keep in business for more than a couple of years ( .qpon being my favorite :D ). There are even TLDs like .wed that have the most bizarre registry agreements - as it will be used for family wedding websites and the interest seems to drop after the initial couple of years, they are reacting by having a price of around $150 per year for the first two and then skyrocketing to $30k per year, just so most will drop their domains and others can use it too. Its really mind-boggling the idea behind some of those and I definitely think that it will be a short-lived fame for most :)
     
    Rado_ch, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  9. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #9
    If some new gTLDs declare bankruptcy will shake the new gTLD foundation a lot. Maybe i should suggest a friend to invest his money to a new gTLD idea.
     
    gigalicious, Mar 21, 2014 IP
  10. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #10
    Forgot to mention that the $250,000 initial application fee + $X,XXX fees to prepare the application + $X,XXX for integration with some of the known gTLD registry providers (at the best case scenario) and without any marketing or advertising budget will help you understand when you read registration numbers which gTLDs wait to get their money back and which of them can call their gTLDs an investment.

    (Not so important as real cash but they already wait 3 years to get their money back from the time most of them applied for the gTLD)
     
    gigalicious, Mar 22, 2014 IP
  11. delix

    delix Greenhorn

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    #11
    What are the prices of such domains? I found a video that pretty well illustrates the idea of new domains and web addresses. But I can't find any information about prices of recently released new gTLDs?
     
    delix, Mar 25, 2014 IP
  12. Rado_ch

    Rado_ch Well-Known Member

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    #12
    That's because the prices differ very much and each TLD might have a different one. They are generally much more expensive than gTLD's like .com but you might be able to snatch some of the new extensions at a decent price. Although I don't find much point in that, as most new TLD's are pretty crap and the cheap ones would probably be the "cream of the crap" :D
     
    Rado_ch, Mar 25, 2014 IP
  13. Brian123

    Brian123 Well-Known Member

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    #13
    I must admit that I have kind of jumped on the new TLD bandwagon.
    I do think that there is a place/market for them, if you are lucky enough to get a really good/marketable one, I think you could be on the way to make quite a lot of cash.

    Swimsuit.photos recently sold for $3550. Not bad eh?
     
    Brian123, Mar 26, 2014 IP
  14. goldmon

    goldmon Well-Known Member

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    #14
    always prefer COM's its the king of tlds
     
    goldmon, Mar 27, 2014 IP
  15. H0stZealot

    H0stZealot Active Member

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    #15
    To be honest, we are all realists. Conservatives and innovationists are just opposite degrees of realists. Conservatives say - .COM is best, it will be best forever, nothing will shake it - and they are right. At the moment.

    Innovationists say - decent .COM names are rare to find, 99% of these are taken and the ones left are nearly worthless. Nearly 99% of new gTLDS are free for taking and offer great possibilities. They are also right. At the moment.

    We now face nearly the same situation we faced 20 years ago, when .com was implemented. It was first just one of TLDs, stating domain is for COMpany or COMmercial use. Internet was considered to be free forever and unable to generate profit , .edu was considered to be the best, as Internet was thought of as an endless library.

    What do we see in 20 years? .COMs own the place, .edu are long forgotten and everybody chases the only goal - PROFIT! Was it expected back then? Hardly. However, people able to logically analize the situation invested thousands of dollars into .COMs only to sell them some years later for millions (businessdotcom and sexdotcom were sold for several dozen million dolalrs each, after being registered for ~$40 each).

    Who knows the state of events now? Who can foretell the future? Why do domainers, players with cold and logical mind, invest money in new gTLDs? Maybe, they expect another wave of universal, requested and highly demanded names to emerge? Why not following their lead then?

    My conclusions are: for now - .com is the leader. What will the situation be in several years - nobody knows. But investing free funds into new names can generate HUGE income afterwards.

    After all, why not investing $40 to get $4000 back in a year or two? If you can afford it.
     
    H0stZealot, Mar 27, 2014 IP
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  16. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #16
    It's not like that.
    Before 20 years there was NO internet, so no TLDs, no suffix awareness, no type in domains theory, no hard google seo competition, i was there, i register my first domain in 1996, still have some of them.

    Now, go out in the street and tell someone your website without suffix, you can imagine what he will type at the end. Consider this one a lost customer at the 90% of the cases (if he's not internet savvy).

    Also COMs obey at the basic and most dominant rule of the market.
    When the demand is greater than the offer then the prices boost to the sky.
    Check this at LLL.com's.
    Do you think that new gTLDs will flood in a year or two ? Even an Indian .guru would say NO.

    You have WAY more chances to make money if you buy a premium .COM and resell it than wait with this suffix pile.

    Consider also the registry policies. For me .PRO had the benefit to become huge, but no they launched it with extremely restrictive criteria, revised their agreement with ICANN but Elvis had the left the building.
    Check also .travel, nice TLD BUT only for professionals of tourism.

    Last but not least, when you see domain sales. Check if you can verify the results of the sale.
    You can't imagine that a X,XXX USD domains was sold but left parked for a year or two for example.
    So reported domain sales don't mean that the owner took his money.
     
    gigalicious, Mar 28, 2014 IP
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  17. H0stZealot

    H0stZealot Active Member

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    #17
    Actually, Internet was long before 1996, it was just much less accessible then. Several .com names were registered back in 1991 and are still operational (yet most of the names were reserved by ICANN, like 1-2-3 symbol names or certain acronyms). Feel free to read ICANN portal, all info is there, I will not flood this topic with links.

    You are absolutely right when you say that average bypasser on the street assumes any name to be .com. However, this obviously leads to the pool of .COM names to be depleted fast. This urges ICANN to accept new names, because demand is high - so prices are, you are right again.

    However, .net and .org and .biz and .us and a bunch of other TLDs, which had to compete with almighty .COM have found their way. They had multiple restrictions and obligations first (just as these new gTLDs have nowadays) - and the suffered huge fall of demand, when .COM began rising.
    Nevertheless, these names exist now and serve their niche of the market, new names are registered regularly and websites function as well as .COM ones. .COM may be more SEO friendly from some points of view, but other names did not extinct, they still exist and we all know .COM now costs ~$5-8 at Verisign, the same as .net and all others (registrars rarely sell for less than $8).

    What I wass trying to tell - .COM is the leader now and will surely remain such for the few next years. However, Internet changes drastically, new technologies and algorythms emerge really often. Could you imagine the current state of events 20 years ago? I could not, and I will not try to predict the situation 20 years ahead.

    As for restrictions - .net, .org, .info and other withdrawed these, because of the lack of demand. .US still applies some restrictions, as well as .DE and several others, like co.uk or com.au - but these are merely exclusions that prove the rule - you have to adapt if you want to survive.

    You are also absolutely right about the situation with premium .COMs nowadays, but I would not be so sure about the situation in 5-10 years.

    New gTLDs will have to adapt or they will be forgotten and left aside the road. I am sure these restrictions will be removed in the years to come, as Registries are realists. Why trying to sell what people do not need instead of offering the names they demand? Registries just wanted to differ from .COM, but they will have to follow the way .net and .org and others followed, it is just a matter of time.

    Registering a sound name in time to re-sell it later for a much higher price - is a matter of skill and financial possibilities. If you have it - feel free to try your luck. If you don't - don't blame gTLDs.
     
    H0stZealot, Mar 29, 2014 IP
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  18. Brian123

    Brian123 Well-Known Member

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    #18
    Magazine.photography sold for $3500... bubble - maybe? https://www.afternic.com/recentlysold
    I like some of the new TLD's... I think (some) have a strong potential. Magazine.photography looks nicer than magazinephotography.com.
    Dot com will always be the king, but some of the new tld's open up a lot of new possibilities.
     
    Brian123, Mar 29, 2014 IP
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  19. gigalicious

    gigalicious Greenhorn

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    #19
    In general what you say is true. However registering a sound name and resell it later for a much higher price is only luck. Skills and Financial capabilities/possibilities is now with COMs. I think i said it from the start somewhere. Internet change, people don't. They continue to grow with things they learned and some of them deny / reject the new additions. New gTLDs is the new reality but they will be part of internet at the next generation when they will grow with them as internet standard and not like a techie comet.
    I still see errors you can't imagine with COMs imagine the typos a .photography domain will bring for his owner. If i have a business that you can't afford to lose visitors would you choose a .abcdefghijklmnoprq domain or a .COM ? (still .COM has misspells with .KOM)

    New gTLDs have more sense to me for IDNs. Before you had to use a multi-keyboard. The IDN part was the domain but the suffix was in latin. Now these people have a chance to use 100% their native keyboard.
     
    gigalicious, Mar 29, 2014 IP