1. Advertising
    y u no do it?

    Advertising (learn more)

    Advertise virtually anything here, with CPM banner ads, CPM email ads and CPC contextual links. You can target relevant areas of the site and show ads based on geographical location of the user if you wish.

    Starts at just $1 per CPM or $0.10 per CPC.

Cat 5e vs Cat 6 Ethernet Patch Cables?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by jrbiz, Nov 19, 2013.

?

Do you use Cat 5e or Cat 6 cables in your network

  1. Cat 5e

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Cat 6

    66.7%
  3. Cat 5e and Cat 6

    33.3%
  4. Another Ethernet Patch Cable

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. #1
    A while ago, we asked the same question in a different forum focused on network managers and IT consultants. I was thinking that there may be some similar IT folks on this forum and would like to hear opinions on which type pf cable you use in your network and why.
    SEMrush
    As a cable distributor offering both products, we are agnostic about which one our customers use, but I like to stay on top of the issue as we are occasionally asked which type we recommend. Thanks!
     
    jrbiz, Nov 19, 2013 IP
    SEMrush
  2. datafile

    datafile Member Affiliate Manager

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    #2
    Cat6 for 10Gig connections and Cat6/Cat5 for 1Gig and lower...
     
    datafile, Nov 19, 2013 IP
  3. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #3
    Thanks datafile. So you mix Cat 5e and Cat 6 on certain networks? My understanding is that would be "waste" of Cat 6 cables as they will be dragged down by the Cat 5e cables? Also, my understanding is that both Cat 5e and Cat 6 cables support 10G, though Cat 6 support longer transmission lengths?
     
    jrbiz, Nov 19, 2013 IP
  4. datafile

    datafile Member Affiliate Manager

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    #4
    I personally would recommend to use Cat6 even for 1-2m cables to connect 10Gig equpment
     
    datafile, Nov 19, 2013 IP
  5. Densely

    Densely Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    53
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    125
    #5
    Do we really need Cat6 cable?
    How much data your router/modem can handle per second?
    If you even get router, modem and data connection capable of handling 10gb data/second, your hard drive will become the bottleneck with 3gbps (in some casaes 6 gbps) data handling capability.
     
    Densely, Dec 15, 2013 IP
  6. digitalpoint

    digitalpoint Overlord of no one Staff

    Messages:
    38,263
    Likes Received:
    2,595
    Best Answers:
    460
    Trophy Points:
    710
    Digital Goods:
    29
    #6
    Cat 6 cables are so cheap, there really is no reason to use cat5/5e anymore.
     
    digitalpoint, Dec 15, 2013 IP
  7. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #7
    I agree to a certain extent that the cost of all network cables, copper and fiber, are not much more than "noise" in the overall cost of the network or data center. However, in my experience, there is typically a significant percentage cost increase (approximately 50%) between Cat 5e and Cat 6 due to the increased costs of the copper, jacks, and manufacturing involved with Cat 6. If you are only buying 100 cables, it is not a big deal. One large financial institution's IT director that I spoke to recently said that they spend $5MM per year on patch cables. That may have been an exaggeration, but even if they spend $1MM on cables per year, even a 20% savings would add up to some real money. If, of course, there is not a clear benefit to using Cat 6 that outweighs the potential savings.
     
    jrbiz, Dec 15, 2013 IP
  8. jasonholder352

    jasonholder352 Peon

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    #8
    Hi Jrbiz,
    There are Different Companies of networking cables.The Most different between Cat5e And Cat6 Plenum Is their Data transfer and AWG.cat5e plenum Data transfer speed is 1GB And The speed of Data transfer in Cat6 Plenum is 6GB.
    for more information contact me:
    Regard:
    Jason holder
     
    jasonholder352, Jul 27, 2017 IP
  9. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #9
    Thanks for your reply on this old thread. So do your purchase them for your or others' networks? Do you use one or both types, depending on the application or do you stick to one?
     
    jrbiz, Jul 27, 2017 IP
  10. malky66

    malky66 Acclaimed Member

    Messages:
    3,439
    Likes Received:
    2,056
    Best Answers:
    79
    Trophy Points:
    515
    #10
    lol, did you contact him for more info?

     
    malky66, Jul 27, 2017 IP
    jrbiz likes this.
  11. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #11
    Well, I was trying to see how much misinformation is out there and how knowledgeable or ignorant IT people are about patch cables, so his and others' posts have been somewhat helpful in that regard. But we get daily input from IT people calling in to the business and not having a clue about what to buy or why to buy it. In some ways, patch cables are the "Rodney Dangerfield's" of the data center in that they rarely get any respect. :)
     
    jrbiz, Jul 28, 2017 IP
  12. Hostfinch

    Hostfinch Greenhorn

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    1
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    8
    #12
    Hello,

    Cat5e performs up to 100 MHz and Cat6 provides performance of up to 250 MHz so features for crosstalk cat6 is best.
    Cat5e supports Max 1Gbps but Cat6 supports Max 10Gbps
    Cat5e has potentially more interference than Cat6.
     
    Hostfinch, Aug 13, 2018 IP
  13. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #13
    Thanks for your input but the specs that I see from the cable mfr's are a bit different:

    Cat 5e supports 350 MHz and Cat 6 supports 550 MHz
    Cat 5e supports 1Gb up to 40-50 feet and Cat 6 supports 1Gb up to 140-150 feet. Cat 6a supports 1Gb up to 330 feet (100 meters.)
    I am not aware of any copper cable that supports 10Gb. I sell special "Aqua" fiber optic cables to support 10Gb applications.
     
    jrbiz, Aug 13, 2018 IP
  14. JulietAdams

    JulietAdams Peon

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Best Answers:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    #14
    1.Cat6 Ethernet cables:
    Cat6 ethernet cable is being made with 23guage conductor wire as opposed to the slightly smaller 24guage for Cat5e.
    It is a standardized twisted pair cable that reduces crosstalk, allows for faster data transfer.
    Cat5e offers same benefits and speed of cat6 at a better cost than the cat6
    ● For Ethernet use, cat5e is considered as a standard market choice


    2.Cat5e Ethernet cables:
    Category 5e (Cat5e) is an enhanced version of Category 5 cable. Cat5e ethernet cables are deployed in many places.
    Cat 5 cable standard provides performance of up to 1000 Mbps speed and is suitable for most varieties of Ethernet over twisted pair.

    .Benefits of Cat5e Plenum Cable
    ●Identical capability and velocity of cat6
    ● An improved version of cat5
    ● Superior data transfer
    ● Best suitable for tailored network installation
    ● Inter connectivity between workstations
    ● Cost effective cable available on the marke
     
    JulietAdams, Sep 24, 2018 IP
  15. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #15
    A lot of misinformation in this post. E.g., Cat 5e and Cat 6 do NOT have identical capability nor same benefits. Cat 5e Plenum is not needed for interconnectivity between workstations; it is used in walls, ceilings, and floors due to fire regulations. Much more wrong with this post, but you get the idea.
     
    jrbiz, Sep 24, 2018 IP
  16. malky66

    malky66 Acclaimed Member

    Messages:
    3,439
    Likes Received:
    2,056
    Best Answers:
    79
    Trophy Points:
    515
    #16
    It's a typical case of someone copying and pasting some crap from a crap website on a subject they know bugger all about..
     
    malky66, Sep 24, 2018 IP
    jrbiz likes this.
  17. SpacePhoenix

    SpacePhoenix Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    12
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    120
    #17
    Is it ever worth using Cat 7 in a home network (assuming potentially activities like streaming video between computers and/or NASs or streaming video between cable boxes)?
     
    SpacePhoenix, Sep 24, 2018 IP
    jrbiz likes this.
  18. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #18
    I guess it comes down to a few issues:

    1. What type of wiring do you have in the walls (if any?) If it is Cat 5e or Cat 6 wiring that you will be connecting to, then a Cat 7 patch cable to the device will not help at all.

    2. Beyond that, right now you could view Cat 7 as an investment for the future as many current devices (computers, routers, etc.) will probably not take advantage of the higher bandwidth, anyway. Of course, in the years ahead as devices and their connectivity hardware speeds up, it could help.

    3. If I was running a patch cable a long distance (e.g., 50+ meters) despite everything I said above, I would probably put in the best cable I could buy. That would be based more on faith and hope that it might forgive some networking sins, but not for sound engineering reasons.
     
    jrbiz, Sep 25, 2018 IP
  19. SpacePhoenix

    SpacePhoenix Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    12
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    120
    #19
    I use Gigabit powerline adapters, cat 6 cables from the powerline adapters to every device (inc the router). Not that practical to install patch cables as it's concrete walls. As i'm using cat 6 cables from the adapters to every device would the mains cable technically be classed as cat 6 when thought of as network cable?
     
    SpacePhoenix, Sep 25, 2018 IP
  20. jrbiz

    jrbiz Illustrious Member

    Messages:
    4,288
    Likes Received:
    1,616
    Best Answers:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    420
    #20
    First, because of the interference and lack of shielding on the electrical wiring relied upon by a powerline adapter, you will not be getting Cat 6 performance from your set up. Routers base their data speeds on the weakest link in the network which in this case would be the electrical wiring. What speed you actually will get from the electrical wiring depends on many factors, with interference being the big one. That is why Cat 6 uses four twisted pairs and a plastic spline between them to minimize crosstalk and other negative effects. Electrical wiring has none of that protection and, of course, is running analog power alongside the much weaker data signal.

    Don't get me wrong: it sounds like using a powerline adapter is the best option for you; my comment is that those Cat 6 cables' bandwidth will not be fully utilized. As a consequence, upgrading to Cat 7 will provide no benefit, either.
     
    jrbiz, Sep 27, 2018 IP