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Can Some one explain the HTML and HTML5 difference??

Discussion in 'HTML & Website Design' started by seofords, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. deathshadow

    deathshadow Acclaimed Member

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    #21
    WRONG, they lose a percentage of SHARE. In terms of the number of users they haven't lost JACK!!!

    Though sure, lots of people try to LIE TO YOU using statistics to say that... but you have to ask a percentage of WHAT? If they don't say percentage of how many they're probably lying or making mistakes with the conclusions.

    Back in 2004 when IE had a whopping 94% of the market share, there were only around 750 million people online... Today sure, they only have a 32% share according to Statcounter (23% according to wikimedia, 52% according to NetApplications! -- I used the middle number), but there are over 2.4 billion people online.

    94% of 750 million is 705 million. 32% of 2.4 billion is 768 million... Uhm, which one's really less?

    IE has simply failed to spread into new markets. That's it.... though admittedly, last year they did peak at over 1 billion users, they STILL have more people using it than they did in 2004.

    You clearly should do more research on how statistics work before opening your mouth about the downfall of a product.

    ALSO, using statistics "IE is 23% or less and on the decline according to wikimedia" is idiotic when you're talking out of 2.4 billion people :D -- at that point even Opera's crappy little 3% works out to 72 million users. It becomes a whole different ballgame when you talk actual body count, instead of buying into the marketing lies that are percentage abuse.
    SEMrush
     
    deathshadow, Sep 27, 2012 IP
    SEMrush
  2. Nullifi3d

    Nullifi3d Peon

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    #22
    You have a good point, but I would still rather stay up to date than keep coding to an out dated standard just because less than 20% of the market still utilizes an internet browser that continues to stay behind the curve. Plus, the 20% of the market that still utilizes IE most likely isn't even going to come across my website or understand what it is I offer; thus I am not worried about my site showing up properly on their screen anyways.

    Keep in mind that this biased interpretation of IE is my opinion based on MY own target audience for MY website, not everyone else's. I'm sure a website about how to use windows OS/software would need to remain 100% IE compliant.

    I'll stick to my assumptions that IE will continue to follow a downward trend. I don't give a flying F how big the market share is; throughout another decade of decreasing of "market share" I won't give an F about IE's single digit % of the market share no matter how many billions that may be.
     
    Nullifi3d, Sep 27, 2012 IP
  3. HostPlanz

    HostPlanz Active Member

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    #23
    Pffttttt...... Ok sir. Because those stats are posted on the internet, it must be true.
    To hell with IE. We don't need their users' money, right? That "less than 20%" isn't worth our time.

    For IE to have less than 20% of the market's user, I'm guessing everyone and their dog either owns either a MAC/*Nix/etc OS, and ALL owners of Windows systems, knows that IE is only there for downloading another browser. :confused:
     
    HostPlanz, Sep 27, 2012 IP
  4. Nullifi3d

    Nullifi3d Peon

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    #24
    lol.....

    thanks for agreeing. You must have come to your senses. :cool: I develop my sites to be properly viewable in all major browsers, but all I was saying was that if someone wants to not stay up to speed with w3 compliant markup standards because an old version of IE doesn't support it then that is their loss. I doubt the small percentage of IE users that don't upgrade their browser (especially because windows update does that for them) are going to hurt my growth potential. Besides, I know for a fact anyone using IE 7 isn't going to purchase web hosting anytime soon.... GTFOH
     
    Nullifi3d, Sep 27, 2012 IP
  5. logocows

    logocows Peon

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    #25
    HTML5 is the latest version of html available out there and it offers a lot of improvements in functionality and use of codes.
     
    logocows, Sep 27, 2012 IP
  6. wilsonn

    wilsonn Peon

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    #26
    The primary one is consistent, defined error handling. As you know, HTML purposely supports 'tag soup', or the ability to write malformed code and have it corrected into a valid document. The problem is that the rules for doing this aren't written down anywhere. When a new browser vendor wants to enter the market, they just have to test malformed documents in various browsers (especially IE) and reverse-engineer their error handling. If they don't, then many pages won't display correctly (estimates place roughly 90% of pages on the net as being at least somewhat malformed).
    So, HTML5 is attempting to discover and codify this error handling, so that browser developers can all standardize and greatly reduce the time and money required to display things consistently. As well, long in the future after HTML has died as a document format, historians may still want to read our documents, and having a completely defined parsing algorithm will greatly aid this.

    There are many other smaller efforts taking place in HTML5, such as better-defined semantic roles for existing elements (<strong> and <em> now actually mean something different, and even <b> and <i> have vague semantics that should work well when parsing legacy documents) and adding new elements with useful semantics - <article>, <section>, <header>, <aside>, and <nav> should replace the majority of <div>s used on a web page, making your pages a bit more semantic, but more importantly, easier to read. No more painful scanning to see just what that random </div> is closing - instead you'll have an obvious </header>, or </article>, making the structure of your document much more intuitive.
     
    wilsonn, Sep 27, 2012 IP
  7. ericfox

    ericfox Peon

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    #27
    Introduction of HTML 5 is going to drastically change the world of Web Design. As far as coding languages are concerned, there seems to be no end to the race of trying to make the task of web designing easier. The future of the web designing is going to be dictated by the standards of the new HTML 5. The interoperability is going to be improved by the API. The API is also going to reduce the cost of web design and development. HTML 5 includes exclusive applications pertaining to web configuration that have no match in the XHTML 2.0. The HTML 5 is sure to have a positive effect on the standards of web design and accessibility of the websites.
     
    ericfox, Oct 2, 2012 IP