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Advice Please: Did My Programmer Write Proper Code? How Do I Check?

Discussion in 'PHP' started by flemingconsultants, Jun 26, 2017.

  1. #1
    Hello- I could use some help. I am a career counselor and not a programmer. I am just about finished with an eCourse that took me to 30 countries and 3 years of research. By course end you will have chosen the specific career you love and create a 10 year career plan to make it happen. See http://mattdonatelle.com To create the eCourse, the programmer I hired used : Optimize press https://www.optimizepress.com/ WP Courseware https://flyplugins.com/wp-courseware/ Membermouse https://membermouse.com/ and some custom coding (php I believe) Site should be done in next week or two. Before paying programmer, I want to make sure his code was done properly. If someone could help and guide me through this, would be appreciative. Be happy to give you free access to the eCourse- -if you are interested in subject matter ($297 Value), etc.... Thanks-Matt
    SEMrush
     
    flemingconsultants, Jun 26, 2017 IP
    SEMrush
  2. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #2
    If a coder takes a Wordpress theme / plugins and makes a site, not much actual coding (from that person's perspective) have gone into making the actual site. That, however, doesn't mean it doesn't involve quite a bit of work - depends entirely on what kind of customization has been done.
    It also depends on what price you're paying.
    Regardless of all that, however, NOT paying is not an option. You've asked for something, it has been delivered (I assume), and that means the work should be paid for, regardless of code quality, unless that is a specific entry in the contract, that the coder needs to provide specific readability, following standards etc. If all that is required is that the site loads in most modern browsers and works on mobile, and it does... then you should pay. I get a little worried when I see things like "site is nearly done, but before I pay..."-statements. The work is done. It has been provided to you, the buyer, hence a product has been delivered, and you should pay for that product.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jun 26, 2017 IP
  3. NetStar

    NetStar Notable Member

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    #3
    Popsicle can't read. He wasn't debating whether or not the programmer should be paid but rather if he produced quality code (like he asked)
     
    NetStar, Jun 28, 2017 IP
  4. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #4
    Seriously? When you write this:
    I interprete that as a statement going towards either not paying if the code isn't good, or at least reducing payment. Which might be perfectly okay, depending on the contract, but not as a blanket statement. And yes, I can read just fine.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jun 30, 2017 IP
  5. flemingconsultants

    flemingconsultants Greenhorn

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    #5
    Popsicle- I have absolutely no idea why you responded/interpreted in the way you did. Makes zero sense. I assume someone did not pay you for your services recently and you decided to vent on me. Anyhow I did get advice I needed. Thanks
     
    flemingconsultants, Jun 30, 2017 IP
  6. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #6
    I reacted the way I did because you phrased your question the way you did. It was a perfectly valid interpretation. Also, I did not come out and say you were gonna refuse to pay, I just said it concerned me that it could be interpreted that way. From my quite reasonable statement, to personally attacking me, and randomly accusing me of venting... I'm not gonna stoop down to your level, however.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jul 1, 2017 IP
  7. NetStar

    NetStar Notable Member

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    #7
    To the original poster... it's clear what you wrote. PoPSiCLe just can't read. You can post some of the souce code here or the specifics of the project and someone can give you an idea.
     
    NetStar, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  8. NetStar

    NetStar Notable Member

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    #8

    It if isn't done properly or meets the standards perhaps he would ask for a revision. There doesn't suggest he won't pay.
     
    NetStar, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  9. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #9
    How the hell do you read "before I pay programmer"? There is no reason to mention payment if all you're interested in is the quality of the code. If he'd written "before I accept the final product, I would like to know if the code is good or not, or if I should request revisions", that would've been a completely different matter. Language. It's important. You should look into it.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  10. NetStar

    NetStar Notable Member

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    #10
    Like I said, you don't know how to read. He wrote (and I quote) "Before paying programmer, I want to make sure his code was done properly" you can read that in his original post. And in case you forgot to read his reply (that you also replied to) he clarified that he wasn't going to stiff the programmer and that was not his intent in his original post.

    You are right. Language is important. Is there something you are having difficulty understanding here?
     
    NetStar, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  11. qwikad.com

    qwikad.com Illustrious Member Affiliate Manager

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    #11
    LOL. You both can't read. He said: "Anyhow I did get advice I needed. Thanks". But, yeah, @PoPSiCLe was right. "Before paying programmer, I want to make sure his code was done properly" can only mean one thing, if it's not done properly, I may refuse to pay. What's so no clear about that? And honestly, he has the right to do so. I wouldn't pay someone either if they tried to make me buy a useless script.


     
    qwikad.com, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  12. NetStar

    NetStar Notable Member

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    #12
    If it can only mean one thing then you wouldn't say may refuse to pay but instead defiantly refuse to pay. However, since it can mean several things (ie. Ask to revise) then PoPSiCLe is wrong with assuming he isn't going to pay. Which also mean you are wrong with assuming there is only one interpretation of the intent behind the original posters question. You both need to go on to QwikAd.com and find a tutor. But first you must find some traffic to attract a tutor to advertise his/her services.
     
    NetStar, Jul 3, 2017 IP
  13. mmerlinn

    mmerlinn Prominent Member

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    #13
    I am a native English speaker, unlike most others in this thread, and I came away with the SAME impression that @PoPSiCLe did. If the OP did not mean to give that impression then he should have worded his query differently.
     
    mmerlinn, Jul 3, 2017 IP
    PoPSiCLe and qwikad.com like this.
  14. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #14
    Yes, I'm very well aware. And that can be read as "if the code is not good, I won't pay the programmer who made it". Again, he could have phrased it differently if he just wanted to know if he should ask for rewrites / revisions.
    What now? This is, verbatim, what he said in the second post:
    Where, in that post, does he clarify that he didn't intend to stiff the programmer? He said I had interpreted the post wrong, but doesn't say anything about what he wanted to do. The rest of the post was mostly an unveiled jab at me, and a statement that he got what he needed.
    No, not really. Apart from the fact that you have some problems understanding nuances in language, it seems, and goes to lengths to make sure you tell us all about those issues.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jul 5, 2017 IP
  15. JEET

    JEET Notable Member

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    #15
    I don't know what you mean by "proper code"
    But before you accept the code/site, you should test its functionality completely
    Ask them to upload it somewhere on their domain/server, and give you an access link.
    They probably won't upload it on your domain until payment is released, but they shouldn't have any problems uploading it on their own server somewhere.
    Here you can check all the functionality you asked for and make sure that things are working the way you want them to.
    Create some dummy accounts, act as if you are a customer/client of the services offered by the site, upload videos (if that is a function etc), check with different browsers, multiple accounts etc etc

    Also check if proper "form" validation is in place or not.
    For example, if a "enter phone number" field is accepting only numbers, or is it accepting just anything.
    Email fields are accepting valid emails, or just anything...
    If "required" form fields are generating an error message when left empty, or is the form submitting anyways

    If form data is stored in a database, then make sure to add characters like single quotes, double quotes when filling the form during testing.
    If a "mysql" error is generated, then tell your coder to fix it.
    This can prove to be a major security bug later on...

    You'd also need to check how passwords, cookies and sessions are handled, but that probably won't be possible until you get access to raw code.
    Basically, passwords should not be stored openly in databases. Should be encrypted
    Cookies should not store private info and passwords
    Data coming from Cookies should be rechecked, and not to be taken for granted
    Similar rules apply to session data

    If a file/download is available to paid members only, then the clickable link should either:
    either expire after a certain time, or
    the directory where the file is stored should be password protected using htaccess
    The download should go through a php script where member credentials are rechecked

    Otherwise, someone can just look at the source code and share the link wherever they want...

    You also need to make sure that queries are following proper INDEXES, or else site will give up in heavy traffic mode, or when tables grow large.
    But again, that won't be possible until you get access to raw code...
    take care :)
     
    JEET, Jul 6, 2017 IP
  16. PoPSiCLe

    PoPSiCLe Illustrious Member

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    #16
    No! For all that is holy, no. Passwords should NOT be encrypted. They should be HASHED. Which might seem similar, but definitely isn't. Encryption is two-way - if you encrypt something, you can decrypt it, if you have the key. Theoretically, you should not be able to get anything meaningful out of a hash, it will only work if the entered password (+ salt, of course) matches the hash already stored in the database - that way, you never really store the actual password, just a computation done with the password. Yes, theoretically, it's possible to have two hashes that are equal, but with modern algorithms, that possibility is mostly gone.
    Passwords should definitely not be stored in plain text, of course, and even encryption is better than that, but hashing is the proper way to go for storing passwords.
     
    PoPSiCLe, Jul 8, 2017 IP
    JEET likes this.
  17. flemingconsultants

    flemingconsultants Greenhorn

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    #17
    thanks
     
    flemingconsultants, Jul 13, 2017 IP